See also: Acre and âcre

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

  • aker (archaic)
  • acer (-er form, chiefly UK)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English acre, aker, from Old English æcer (field where crops are grown), from Proto-West Germanic *ak(k)r, from Proto-Germanic *akraz (field), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éǵros (field).

Cognate with Scots acre, aker, acker (acre, field, arable land), North Frisian ecir (field, a measure of land), West Frisian eker (field), Dutch akker (field), German Acker (field, acre), Norwegian åker (field) and Swedish åker (field), Icelandic akur (field), Latin ager (land, field, acre, countryside), Ancient Greek ἀγρός (agrós, field), Sanskrit अज्र (ájra, field, plain).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

acre (plural acres)

  1. An English unit of land area (symbol: a. or ac.) originally denoting a day's plowing for a yoke of oxen, now standardized as 4,840 square yards or 4,046.86 square meters.
    • 2006, Edwin Black, chapter 2, in Internal Combustion[1]:
      Buried within the Mediterranean littoral are some seventy to ninety million tons of slag from ancient smelting, about a third of it concentrated in Iberia. This ceaseless industrial fueling caused the deforestation of an estimated fifty to seventy million acres of woodlands.
    1. (Chester, historical) An area of 10,240 square yards or 4 quarters.[1]
  2. Any of various similar units of area in other systems.
  3. (informal, usually in the plural) A wide expanse.
    I like my new house - there’s acres of space!
  4. (informal, usually in the plural) A large quantity.
  5. (obsolete) A field.
  6. (obsolete) The acre's breadth by the length, English units of length equal to the statute dimensions of the acre: 22 yds (≈20 m) by 220 yds (≈200 m).
  7. (obsolete) A duel fought between individual Scots and Englishmen in the borderlands.

SynonymsEdit

HypernymsEdit

  • (100 carucates, notionally) See hundred
  • (the area able to be plowed by 8 oxen in a year) See carucate
  • (the area able to be plowed by two oxen in a year) See virgate
  • (the area able to be plowed by an ox in a year) See oxgang
  • (the area able to be plowed by an ox in half a season) See nook
  • (the area able to be plowed by an ox in 14 a season) See fardel
  • (10 acres, prob. spurious) acreme

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Terms derived from acre

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Irish: acra
  • Norwegian Bokmål: acre

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Robert Holland, M.R.A.C., A Glossary of Words Used in the County of Chester, Part I--A to F., English Dialect Society, London, 1884, 3

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Robert Holland, M.R.A.C., A Glossary of Words Used in the County of Chester, Part I--A to F., English Dialect Society, London, 1884, 2

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably from Old Norse akr reenforced by Old English æcer (a field, land, that which is sown, sown land, cultivated land; a definite quantity of land, land which a yoke of oxen could plough in a day, an acre, a certain quantity of land, strip of plough-land; crop) .

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

acre f (plural acres)

  1. (historical) acre

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈa.kre/
  • Rhymes: -akre
  • Hyphenation: à‧cre

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin ācre, neuter nominative singular of ācer (sharp). Doublet of agro.

AdjectiveEdit

acre (plural acri, superlative acerrimo)

  1. sharp, sour
    Synonyms: acido, agro, aspro
    Synonyms: amabile, dolce
  2. (transferred sense):
    1. (of a smell) penetrating
      Synonym: pungente
    2. (of a sound) shrill
      Synonym: stridente
  3. harsh, malevolent
    Synonyms: acido, aspro
    Synonyms: amabile, dolce
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • acre in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

NounEdit

acre f pl

  1. plural of acra

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ācre

  1. neuter nominative/accusative/vocative singular of ācer

ReferencesEdit

  • acre in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • acre in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • acre in Richard Stillwell et al., editor (1976) The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites, Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

acre

  1. Alternative form of acorn

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

acre

  1. Alternative form of aker

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

acre f (plural acres)

  1. (Jersey) acre

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nb

EtymologyEdit

From English acre, from Middle English acre, aker (field, acre), from Old English æcer (field where crops are grown, acre), from Proto-West Germanic *ak(k)r (field, open land; acre), from Proto-Germanic *akraz (field, open land), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éǵros (field, pasturage), possibly from *h₂eǵ- (to drive). Doublet of åker.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

acre m (definite singular acren, indefinite plural acre or acres, definite plural acrene)

  1. an acre (an English unit of land area (symbol: ac.) originally denoting a day's plowing for a yoke of oxen, now standardized as 4,840 square yards or 4,046.86 square meters)
    • 1920, Jonas Lie, Samlede Digterverker IV, page 288:
      han havde kjøbt de 125,000 acres land af et kompani eller rettere en bande af svindlere
      he had bought the 125,000 acres of land from a company or rather a gang of scammers
    • 1936, Knut Hamsun, Ringen sluttet I, page 85:
      liten elendig farm, firti acres
      small miserable farm, forty acres
    • 1987, Richard Herrmann, Victoria, page 168:
      [glasshuset] dekket et område på 26 acres, som skulle bli over hundre norske mål
      [the glass house] covered an area of 26 acres, which was to be over a hundred Norwegian acres

ReferencesEdit

  • “acre” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “acre” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).
  • acre” in Store norske leksikon

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

From English acre, from Middle English acre, aker (field, acre), from Old English æcer (field where crops are grown, acre), from Proto-West Germanic *ak(k)r (field, open land), from Proto-Germanic *akraz (field, open land), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éǵros (field, pasturage), possibly from *h₂eǵ- (to drive). Doublet of åker.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

acre m (definite singular acren, indefinite plural acre or acres, definite plural acrane)

  1. an acre (an English unit of land area (symbol: ac.) originally denoting a day's plowing for a yoke of oxen, now standardized as 4,840 square yards or 4,046.86 square meters)

ReferencesEdit


Old IrishEdit

NounEdit

acre n

  1. Alternative spelling of acrae

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
acre unchanged n-acre
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin ācre, neuter nominative singular of ācer (sharp), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ḱrós (sharp). Doublet of agre, agro, ágrio.

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

acre m or f (plural acres, comparable)

  1. sharp (unpleasantly acrid or tart in taste)

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English acre, from Middle English acre, aker, from Old English æcer, from Proto-West Germanic *ak(k)r, from Proto-Germanic *akraz (field), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éǵros (field). Doublet of agro.

NounEdit

acre m (plural acres)

  1. acre (unit of surface area)

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

acre

  1. feminine/neuter plural nominative/accusative of acru

ScotsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English aker, from Old English æcer (field; acre). Cognate with English acre; see there for more.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈekər], [ˈjɪkər]
  • (South Scots) IPA(key): [ˈakər], [ˈɛkər]

NounEdit

acre (plural acres)

  1. An acre (unit of measurement)

Usage notesEdit

The plural is acre when following a numeral.

VerbEdit

acre (third-person singular present acres, present participle acrin, past acrit, past participle acrit)

  1. To let grain crops be harvested at a stated sum per acre.
  2. To be employed in harvesting grain crops at a stated sum per acre.

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈakɾe/, [ˈa.kɾe]

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin ācer (genitive singular ācris). Cf. also agrio.

AdjectiveEdit

acre (plural acres)

  1. bitter; acrid; pungent
  2. caustic
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English acre. Doublet of agro.

NounEdit

acre m (plural acres)

  1. acre

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit