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See also: Ager, äger, åger, and Ağer

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

age +‎ -er

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ager (plural agers)

  1. One who or that which ages something.
  2. (euphemistic) One who is aging; an elderly person.
    • 1965, Richard Hays Williams, Claudine G. Wirths, Lives Through the Years: Styles of Life and Successful Aging, Transaction Publishers →ISBN, page 165
      When the aging person depends on another, the control of the aged one's life space is placed in the hands of another person who may or may not contribute action energy that is appropriate or acceptable from the standpoint of the ager.
    • 2006, Gloria Davenport, Working with Toxic Older Adults: A Guide to Coping with Difficult Elders, Springer Publishing Company →ISBN, page 143
      Inappropriate behavior then erupts from the agers involved, disturbing everyone around, including the agers themselves, who often do not understand what is happening and struggle excessively to maintain rigid control of old perceptions and self images.
    • 2014, Susan H. Mcfadden, Mark Brennan, NEW DIRECTIONS IN THE STUDY OF LATE, Routledge →ISBN, page 62
      This definition of success is located in society's structures and suits society, not the agers. Successful ageing is arguably therefore a socially constructed phenomenon, characterized by lack of “noise,” maintenance of youthful status until death, and a dogged engagement with social structures which appear almost as if designed to discourage the engagement of older people.

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse akr, from Proto-Germanic *akraz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éǵros (field).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ager c (singular definite ageren, plural indefinite agre)

  1. field
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See age (drive).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /aːjər/, [ˈæːjɐ]

VerbEdit

ager

  1. present tense of age

Etymology 3Edit

See agere (act, play).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /aɡeːr/, [aˈɡ̥eɐ̯ˀ]

VerbEdit

ager or agér

  1. imperative of agere

FrenchEdit

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EtymologyEdit

Borrowed recently from Latin ager (field). Cf. also aire, possibly a doublet.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ager m (plural agers)

  1. (historical) medieval territory
  2. (geographical) Mediterranean terrain

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *agros, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éǵros. Cognates include Ancient Greek ἀγρός (agrós), Sanskrit अज्र (ájra) and Old English æcer (English acre).

PronunciationEdit

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈa.ɡer/, [ˈa.ɡɛr]
  • (file)

NounEdit

ager m (genitive agrī); second declension

  1. field, farm
  2. land, estate, park
  3. territory, country
  4. terrain
  5. soil

InflectionEdit

Second declension, nominative singular in -er.

Case Singular Plural
nominative ager agrī
genitive agrī agrōrum
dative agrō agrīs
accusative agrum agrōs
ablative agrō agrīs
vocative ager1 agrī

1May also be agre.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • ager in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ager in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ager in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to irrigate fields: agros irrigare
    • the river floods the fields: flumen agros inundat
    • to settle a large number of people in a country: multitudinem in agris collocare
    • to till the ground: agrum colere (Leg. Agr. 2. 25. 67)
    • to leave fertile ground untilled: agros fertiles deserere
    • to live in the country: in agris esse, habitare
    • the corn is not yet ripe: frumenta in agris matura non sunt (B. G. 1. 16. 2)
    • public land; state domain: ager publicus
    • to allot land: agros assignare (Leg. Agr. 1. 6. 17)
    • to make an inroad into hostile territory: excursionem in hostium agros facere
  • ager in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ager in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Latin agilis (swift). Doublet of agil, a borrowing.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ager m, n (feminine singular ageră, masculine plural ageri, feminine and neuter plural agere)

  1. quick, swift.
  2. smart, cunning, sharp.
  3. (of objects) sharp

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit


ScanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse akr, from Proto-Germanic *akraz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ager m

  1. a field

WelshEdit

NounEdit

ager m (plural agerau)

  1. steam
    Synonyms: stêm, anwedd

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
ager unchanged unchanged hager
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.