antre

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French, from Latin antrum, from Ancient Greek ἄντρον ‎(ántron).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

antre ‎(plural antres)

  1. (archaic) Cavern; cave.
    • 1818, John Keats, Endymion, Book II,
      Aye, millions sparkled on a vein of gold, / Along whose track the prince quick footsteps told, / With all its lines abrupt and angular: / Out-shooting sometimes, like a meteor-star, / Through a vast antre;
    • 1879, George Meredith, The Egoist, Chapter XXIII: Treats of the Union of Temper and Policy,
      Seeing him as she did, she turned from him and shunned his house as the antre of an ogre.
    • 1888, Richard Francis Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 16,
      Hereat quoth he to himself, "If I enter this antre, haply shall I lose myself, and perish of hunger and thirst!"

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin antrum, from Ancient Greek ἄντρον ‎(ántron).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

antre m ‎(plural antres)

  1. cave
  2. den, lair
  3. (anatomy) antrum

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


MirandeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin inter.

PrepositionEdit

antre

  1. between
  2. among

PortugueseEdit

PrepositionEdit

antre

  1. Archaic form of entre.

Serbo-CroatianEdit

NounEdit

antre m ‎(Cyrillic spelling антре)

  1. entrée
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