Open main menu

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
An auger.

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a rebracketing of Middle English a nauger (seen as an + auger), from Old English nafogār (nave drill, literally nave spear), from Proto-Germanic *nabōgaizaz. Cognate with Dutch avegaar.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

auger (plural augers)

  1. A carpenter's tool for boring holes longer than those bored by a gimlet.
  2. A snake or plumber's snake (plumbing tool).
  3. A tool used to bore holes in the ground, e.g. for fence posts
  4. A hollow drill used to take core samples of soil, ice, etc. for scientific study.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

auger (third-person singular simple present augers, present participle augering, simple past and past participle augered)

  1. To use an auger; to drill a hole using an auger.
  2. To proceed in the manner of an auger.
    • 2010, Clive Cussler, Jack Du Brul, The Silent Sea[1]:
      It augered into the water and vanishedunder the surface only to float up again, its keel pointing skyward.
    • 2012, Ronald Wright, A Scientific Romance[2]:
      There was no way to measure progress inside the sphere, to know whether it spun or leapt or wobbled like a top as it augered through the years.
    • 2014, Steven R. Boyett, Mortality Bridge[3]:
      It augers down again behind him to gyre like a mindless deadly battling top.

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From auge.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

auger

  1. to dig in order to get the shape of a trough
  2. to bend a piece of flat iron into the shape of a gutter, of an eavestrough

ConjugationEdit

This is a regular -er verb, but the stem is written auge- before endings that begin with -a- or -o- (to indicate that the -g- is a “soft” /ʒ/ and not a “hard” /ɡ/). This spelling-change occurs in all verbs in -ger, such as neiger and manger.

AnagramsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin augēre, present active infinitive of augeō (I increase, I augment). From Proto-Italic *augeō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ewg-.

Cognates include Proto-Germanic *aukaną, Ancient Greek αὐξάνω (auxánō), Lithuanian áugti, and, via Iranian, Old Armenian վաշխ (vašx). Akin to English eke.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

auger (first-person singular present aujo, first-person singular preterite augí, past participle augido)

  1. To increase, eke, augment
  2. To enlarge, spread, expand
  3. To lengthen
  4. To exaggerate
  5. To honor, enrich
  6. (figuratively) To exalt, praise

ConjugationEdit

  • Rule: g becomes a j before a or o.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit