See also: Bade, badé, and både

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bæd/, /beɪd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æd, -eɪd

VerbEdit

bade

  1. simple past tense of bid
    • 1907, Harold Bindloss, chapter 22, in The Dust of Conflict[1]:
      Pancho, the major-domo, came up to say that Colonel Morales was waiting below. Appleby bade him bring out cigars and wine, and rose from his seat when Morales came in.

Usage notesEdit

The inflected form bade, like the form bidden, is archaic. It remains in marginal use, particularly regarding greetings as in “bade farewell”, but uninflected bid is significantly more common.[1]

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Bid, bade, bidden”, Grammarist

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse baða, baðask, from Proto-Germanic *baþōną (to bathe), cognate with English bathe and German baden.

VerbEdit

bade (imperative bad, infinitive at bade, present tense bader, past tense badede, perfect tense har badet)

  1. (intransitive) to bathe, take a bath, take a swim
  2. (transitive) to bath

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

NounEdit

bade n

  1. indefinite plural of bad

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

bade

  1. (archaic) singular past subjunctive of bidden
  2. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of baden

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

bade

  1. inflection of baden:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. singular imperative
    3. first/third-person singular subjunctive I

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the noun bad

VerbEdit

bade (imperative bad, present tense bader, passive bades, simple past and past participle bada or badet, present participle badende)

  1. to bathe
  2. to bath (British; e.g. bath a baby)
  3. to swim, have a swim

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Persian باده(bâde, wine).

NounEdit

bade

  1. (dated) wine, drink (served alcoholic beverage)