EnglishEdit

 
Beads

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English bede (a prayer), also “a bead for counting prayers” in a peire of bedes (literally a pair of beads), from Old English bedu, bed, ġebed (a request, entreaty, prayer), from Proto-West Germanic *bedu, *bed, *gabed, from Proto-Germanic *bedō, *bedą.

Cognate with Dutch gebed and bede, German Gebet.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /biːd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːd

NounEdit

bead (plural beads)

  1. (archaic) Prayer, later especially with a rosary. [from 9thc.]
  2. Each in a string of small balls making up the rosary or paternoster. [from 14thc.]
  3. A small, round object.
    1. A small, round object with a hole to allow it to be threaded on a cord or wire, particularly for decorative purposes. [from 15thc.]
    2. Various small, round solid objects.
      • 2013 May-June, Charles T. Ambrose, “Alzheimer’s Disease”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 200:
        Similar studies of rats have employed four different intracranial resorbable, slow sustained release systems—surgical foam, a thermal gel depot, a microcapsule or biodegradable polymer beads.
    3. A small drop of water or other liquid. [from 16thc.]
      beads of sweat
    4. A bubble, in spirits.
    5. A small, round ball at the end of a barrel of a gun used for aiming.
      She drew a bead on the target and fired.
      • 1879, R[ichard] J[efferies], chapter 1, in The Amateur Poacher, London: Smith, Elder, & Co., [], OCLC 752825175:
        But then I had the [massive] flintlock by me for protection. ¶ [] The linen-press and a chest on the top of it formed, however, a very good gun-carriage; and, thus mounted, aim could be taken out of the window [], and a 'bead' could be drawn upon Molly, the dairymaid, kissing the fogger behind the hedge, little dreaming that the deadly tube was levelled at them.
  4. (heading) A ridge, band, or molding.
    1. A rigid edge of a tire that mounts it on a wheel; tire bead. [from 20thc.]
    2. (architecture) A narrow molding with semicircular section.
  5. Knowledge sufficient to direct one's activities to a purpose.
    We now have a bead on the main technical issues for the project
  6. (chemistry, dated) A glassy drop of molten flux, as borax or microcosmic salt, used as a solvent and color test for several mineral earths and oxides, as of iron, manganese, etc., before the blowpipe.
    the borax bead;  the iron bead, etc.
  7. Front sight of a gun.

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

terms derived from bead (noun)

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

bead (third-person singular simple present beads, present participle beading, simple past and past participle beaded)

  1. (intransitive) To form into a bead.
    The raindrops beaded on the car's waxed finish.
  2. (transitive) To apply beads to.
    She spent the morning beading the gown.
  3. (transitive) To form into a bead.
    He beaded some solder for the ends of the wire.
  4. (transitive) To cause beads to form on (something).
    • 1941, Emily Carr, Klee Wyck, "Greenville," [1]
      Only the hum of the miserable creatures stirred the heavy murk that beaded our foreheads with sweat as we pushed our way through it.

AnagramsEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

be- +‎ ad

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈbɛɒd]
  • Hyphenation: be‧ad
  • Rhymes: -ɒd

VerbEdit

bead

  1. (transitive) to hand in
    beadja a felmondásátto hand in one's notice
  2. (transitive) to give (medicine to someone)
  3. (transitive) to submit, to present (a request)
  4. (transitive) to file (a petition)

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Expressions

Further readingEdit

  • bead in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • bead in Ittzés, Nóra (ed.). A magyar nyelv nagyszótára (’A Comprehensive Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 2006–2031 (work in progress; published A–ez as of 2022)

IrishEdit

VerbEdit

bead

  1. first-person singular future of
    Bead anseo nuair a thiocfaidh tú ar ais.
    I will be here when you come back.

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bead bhead mbead
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

bēad

  1. first/third-person singular preterite indicative of bēodan