See also: Bath, bàth, baþ, bað, and Ba'th

EnglishEdit

 
A western-style bath

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English bath, baþ, from Old English bæþ (bath), from Proto-West Germanic *baþ, from Proto-Germanic *baþą (bath), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₁- (to warm). Corresponding inherited verbs are beath and bathe.

NounEdit

bath (plural baths)

  1. A tub or pool which is used for bathing: bathtub.
  2. A building or area where bathing occurs.
    • 1842, Joseph Gwilt, Encyclopaedia of Architecture
      Among the ancients, the public baths were of amazing extent and magnificence.
  3. (real estate, informal) Clipping of bathroom.
    The master bath has two sinks.
  4. The act of bathing.
  5. A substance or preparation in which something is immersed.
    a bath of heated sand, ashes, steam, or hot air
    • 1879, Th Du Moncel, The Telephone, the Microphone and the Phonograph, Harper, page 166:
      He takes the prepared charcoal used by artists, brings it to a white heat, and suddenly plunges it in a bath of mercury, of which the globules instantly penetrate the pores of charcoal, and may be said to metallize it.
Usage notesEdit

Sense 4. is usually to take (US) or have (UK, Aus) a bath. See also Appendix:Collocations of do, have, make, and take

SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

bath (third-person singular simple present baths, present participle bathing, simple past and past participle bathed)

  1. (transitive) To wash a person or animal in a bath
    • 1990, Mukti Jain Campion, The Baby Challenge: A handbook on pregnancy for women with a physical disability.[1], →ISBN, page 41:
      Somewhere to bath the baby: don't invest in a plastic baby bath. The bathroom handbasin is usually a much more convenient place to bath the baby. If your partner is more able, this could be a task he might take on as his, bathing the baby in a basin or plastic bown on the floor.
    • 2006, Sue Dallas, Diana North and Joanne Angus, Grooming Manual for the Dog and Cat[2], →ISBN, page 91:
      For grooming at home, obviously the choice is yours whether you wish to bath the dog in your own bath or sink, or if you want to buy one specifically for the purpose.
    • 2007, Robin Barker, Baby Love[3], →ISBN, page 179:
      If you find bathing stressfull during the first six weeks, only bath your baby once or twice a week.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Hebrew בַּת(baṯ).

NounEdit

bath (plural baths)

  1. (historical units of measure) A former Hebrew unit of liquid volume (about 23 L or 6 gallons).
    • 1769, Bible (KJV), Ezekiel, 45:10–11:
      Ye shall have just balances, and a just ephah, and a just bath. The ephah and the bath shall be of one measure, that the bath may contain the tenth part of an homer, and the ephah the tenth part of an homer: the measure thereof shall be after the homer.
MeronymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English proper noun Bath where this paper was originally made.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bath m (plural baths)

  1. English high quality letter paper popular in the 19th century.

AdjectiveEdit

bath (plural baths)

  1. Super, great, smashing; beautiful, fine, good, pleasant.

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English bā þā.

DeterminerEdit

bath

  1. Alternative form of bothe (both)

ConjunctionEdit

bath

  1. Alternative form of bothe (both)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English bæþ, from Proto-West Germanic *baþ, from Proto-Germanic *baþą.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bath (plural bathes or baðen)

  1. A bath or pool, especially one by a hot spring; a body of liquid one immerses oneself in.
    1. A bath supposedly having curative or healing properties.
    2. A bath supposedly having spiritual properties.
    3. (alchemy) A bath used to produce distilled water.
  2. The process of having a bath; a bathing.
  3. A medicinal bathing; bathing as a treatment.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: bath
  • Scots: bath
ReferencesEdit

WelshEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Probably from Proto-Celtic *batto-; according to the GPC, possibly related to Latin battuo (I fight, pound, beat (up)), though the semantics are far from certain.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bath m (plural bathau)

  1. (obsolete) kind, sort
    Synonyms: math, siort, teip
  2. stamp, coin

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

bath m (plural baths)

  1. Alternative spelling of bàth (bath, bath tub)

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

bath m (plural baths)

  1. Alternative spelling of bàth (bath (unit of liquid volume))

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
bath fath math unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present) , “bath”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

Further readingEdit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present) , “bath”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

YolaEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English bat, batte, from Old English batt (bat, club, cudgel), probably of Celtic origin.

NounEdit

bath (plural bathès)

  1. stick

ReferencesEdit

  • Jacob Poole (1867) , William Barnes, editor, A glossary, with some pieces of verse, of the old dialect of the English colony in the baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, J. Russell Smith, →ISBN