EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

buffer (plural buffers)

  1. Someone or something that buffs (polishes and makes shiny).
    1. A machine with rotary brushes, passed over a hard floor to clean it.
    2. A machine for polishing shoes and boots.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

buffer

  1. Comparative form of buff: more buff.

Etymology 2Edit

Agent noun from obsolete verb buff (make a dull sound when struck) (mid-16c.), from Old French buffe (blow).

The "bosun's mate" sense is said to be popularly explained by the mate being a "buffer", that is intermediary, between officers and men, but various other explanations have also been proposed.[1]

NounEdit

buffer (plural buffers)

  1. (chemistry) A solution used to stabilize the pH (acidity) of a liquid.
  2. (computing) A portion of memory set aside to store data, often before it is sent to an external device or as it is received from an external device.
  3. Anything used to isolate or minimize the effect of one thing on another.
    1. (mechanical) Anything used to maintain slack or isolate different objects.
    2. (telecommunications) A routine or storage medium used to compensate for a difference in rate of flow of data, or time of occurrence of events, when transferring data from one device to another.
    3. (rail transport) A device on trains and carriages designed to cushion the impact between them.
      • 1885, W. S. Gilbert, The Mikado, Act II, in The Mikado, and Other Plays, New York: Modern Library, 1917, p. 42, [2]
        The idiot who, in railway carriages, / Scribbles on window panes, / We only suffer / To ride on a buffer / In Parliamentary trains.
      • 1953, C. S. Lewis, The Silver Chair, Collins, 1998, Chapter 14,
        Then, with a shock like a thousand goods trains crashing into a thousand pairs of buffers, the lips of rock closed.
    4. (rail transport) The metal barrier to help prevent trains from running off the end of the track.
    5. An isolating circuit, often an amplifier, used to minimize the influence of a driven circuit on the driving circuit.
    6. (politics, international relations) A buffer zone (such as a demilitarized zone) or a buffer state.
    7. (figuratively) A gap that isolates or separates two things.
      • 2011 November 10, Jeremy Wilson, “England Under 21 5 Iceland Under 21 0: match report”, in Telegraph[3]:
        An utterly emphatic 5-0 victory was ultimately capped by two wonder strikes in the last two minutes from Aston Villa midfielder Gary Gardner. Before that, England had utterly dominated to take another purposeful stride towards the 2013 European Championship in Israel. They have already established a five-point buffer at the top of Group Eight.
  4. (Britain, nautical, slang) The chief bosun's mate.
    • 2001, Mark Higgitt, Through Fire and Water (page 43)
      He decided to run for president of the POs' Mess against the Buffer, Chief Bosun's Mate Mal Crane, but the two had a face-to-face in his cabin one night in Narvik and sorted it out.
    • 2015, Peter Broadbent, A Singapore Fling: An AB's Far-Flung Adventure
      I happen to be on the brow handing my Bosun's Mate duties over to an Ordinary Seaman when the Buffer arrives with an unofficial Side-Party to man the brow with Bosun's Calls at the ready.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

buffer (third-person singular simple present buffers, present participle buffering, simple past and past participle buffered)

  1. To use a buffer or buffers; to isolate or minimize the effects of one thing on another.
    • 1962 October, G. Freeman Allen, “The New Look in Scotland's Northern Division—II”, in Modern Railways, page 274:
      The electronic apparatus is designed to buffer up the sorted wagons in the sidings at a speed not exceeding 4.7 m.p.h.—a particularly important provision in this yard, with its substantial traffic in whisky.
  2. (computing) To store data in memory temporarily.
  3. (chemistry) To maintain the acidity of a solution near a chosen value by adding an acid or a base.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

buffer (plural buffers)

  1. (colloquial) A good-humoured, slow-witted fellow, usually an elderly man.
    • 1864-1865, Charles Dickens, “Book The First, chapter 2 "The Man from Somewhere"”, in Our Mutual Friend[4]:
      Lastly, the looking-glass reflects Boots and Brewer, and two other stuffed Buffers interposed between the rest of the company and possible accidents.
    • 1864-1865, Charles Dickens, “Book The First, chapter 10 "A Marriage Contract"”, in Our Mutual Friend[5]:
      Here, too, are Boots and Brewer, and the two other Buffers; each Buffer with a flower in his button-hole, his hair curled, and his gloves buttoned on tight, apparently come prepared, if anything had happened to the bridegroom, to be married instantly.
    • 1955, C. S. Lewis, The Magician's Nephew, Collins, 1998, Chapter 1,
      I can’t expect two youngsters like you to find it much fun talking to an old buffer like me.

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Grey Funnel Lines: Traditional Song & Verse of the Royal Navy 1900-1970, Cyril Tawney, 2015 [1]

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English buffer.

NounEdit

buffer c (singular definite bufferen, plural indefinite buffere)

  1. (chemistry) buffer

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English buffer.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

buffer m (plural buffers, diminutive buffertje n)

  1. A buffer for storage.
  2. A buffer, margin for safety.
  3. (rail transport) A buffer (device on trains and carriages designed to cushion the impact between them).

Derived termsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English buffer.

NounEdit

 
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buffer m (invariable)

  1. (computing) buffer
    Synonym: memoria tampone



PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English buffer.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

buffer m (plural buffers)

  1. (computing) buffer (memory for temporary storage)

RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

VerbEdit

buffer

  1. (Puter) to blow

SynonymsEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

buffer m (plural buffers)

  1. (computing) buffer

WestrobothnianEdit

VerbEdit

buffer

  1. Alternative form of bufför