EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English *bypassen, *bipassen (suggested by past participle by-past, bipast), equivalent to by- +‎ pass.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 
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bypass (plural bypasses)

  1. A road that passes around something, such as a residential area or business district.
  2. Going past or around
  3. A section of pipe that conducts a fluid around some other fixture
  4. An electrical shunt
  5. (medicine) An alternative passage created to divert a bodily fluid around a damaged organ; the surgical procedure to construct such a bypass

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

bypass (third-person singular simple present bypasses, present participle bypassing, simple past and past participle bypassed)

  1. To avoid an obstacle etc, by constructing or using a bypass
  2. To ignore the usual channels or procedures
    • 2022 November 16, Paul Bigland, “From rural branches to high-speed arteries”, in RAIL, number 970, page 52:
      Thanks to Brexit, many ferry companies now run direct from Ireland to the EU mainland, bypassing UK ports such as Fishguard, with an impact on traffic.

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English bypass.

NounEdit

bypass m

  1. bypass

Derived termsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unadapted borrowing from English bypass.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bypass m (plural bypasses or bypass)

  1. (medicine) bypass (a passage created around a damaged organ)
    Synonym: ponte

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unadapted borrowing from English bypass.

NounEdit

bypass n (plural bypassuri)

  1. (medicine) bypass

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unadapted borrowing from English bypass.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbaipas/, [ˈbai̯.pas]

NounEdit

bypass m (plural bypass)

  1. bypass

Usage notesEdit

According to Royal Spanish Academy (RAE) prescriptions, unadapted foreign words should be written in italics in a text printed in roman type, and vice versa, and in quotation marks in a manuscript text or when italics are not available. In practice, this RAE prescription is not always followed.