See also: Caron, carón, and ĉaron

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
The letter "G" with a caron.

EtymologyEdit

Etymology unknown; first known use is the United States Government Printing Office Style Manual of 1967, where it apparently referred to an inverted caret. Possibly derived from caret after its similar shape (^), and with -on either from macron or as an augmentative after reanalysis of -et as a diminutive.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

caron (plural carons)

  1. háček

Usage notesEdit

The term caron gained usage through the computer world, through usage at Adobe and later in Unicode. As such, it is the most common name in many computer environments, whereas some form of háček is more common in linguistic circles.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

caron

  1. accusative singular of caro

FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr
 
caron
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Particularly: "caron below is not a good example, or add others"

EtymologyEdit

From English caron.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

caron m (plural carons)

  1. háček (the háček diacritic)

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

caron

  1. accusative singular of caros

WelshEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • carasom (literary, first-person plural)
  • carasant (literary, third-person plural)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

caron

  1. (colloquial) first-person plural preterite of caru
  2. (colloquial) third-person plural preterite of caru

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
caron garon ngharon charon
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.