caudex

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Latin caudex ‎(tree trunk”, “tree stem); compare codex.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

caudex ‎(plural caudices or caudexes)[1]

  1. (botany)[1] An enlargement of the stem, branch or root of a woody plant, usually serving to store water.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 ‖caudex” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [2nd Ed.; 1989]

LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Uncertain, but some have connected it to Proto-Indo-European *h₃osk- ‎(ash tree), the same source as Welsh onnen, Latin ornus ‎(wild mountain ash), Lithuanian úosis, Russian я́сень ‎(jásenʹ), Albanian ah ‎(beech), Ancient Greek ὀξύα ‎(oxúa, beech), Old Armenian հացի ‎(hacʿi). The connection stems from the assumption that Indo-Europeans used hollowed out ash trees as boats and skiffs.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

caudex m ‎(genitive caudicis); third declension

  1. A tree trunk, stump.
  2. A bollard; post.
  3. A book, writing; notebook, account book.
  4. (pejorative) A blockhead, idiot.

DeclensionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative caudex caudicēs
genitive caudicis caudicum
dative caudicī caudicibus
accusative caudicem caudicēs
ablative caudice caudicibus
vocative caudex caudicēs

SynonymsEdit

  • (bollard, blockhead, idiot): gurdus

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Schrader, Prehistoric antiquities of the Aryan peoples: a manual of comparative philology and the earliest culture
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