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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Variant or figurative use of conch. Attested since the nineteenth century.[1]

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

conk (plural conks)

 
Bracket fungus on a fallen tree trunk
  1. The shelf- or bracket-shaped fruiting body of a bracket fungus (also called a shelf fungus), i.e. a mushroom growing off a tree trunk.
  2. (slang) A nose, especially a large one.
  3. Alternative spelling of conch
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

conk (third-person singular simple present conks, present participle conking, simple past and past participle conked)

  1. (slang) To hit, especially on the head.
    • 1960, P[elham] G[renville] Wodehouse, chapter XVII, in Jeeves in the Offing, London: Herbert Jenkins, OCLC 1227855:
      She came skipping to me just now, clapping her little hands and bleating about how very, very happy she was, dear Mrs Travers. The silly young geezer. I nearly conked her one with my trowel. I'd always thought her half-baked, but now I think they didn't even put her in the oven.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From congolene, the brand name of a hair-straightening product.

 
Singer Nat King Cole in 1956 with his hair conked
 
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NounEdit

conk (plural conks)

  1. (US, dated) A hairstyle involving the chemical straightening and styling of kinky hair.

VerbEdit

conk (third-person singular simple present conks, present participle conking, simple past and past participle conked)

  1. (US, dated) To chemically straighten tightly curled hair.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Origin unknown. Attested since the early twentieth century.

VerbEdit

conk (third-person singular simple present conks, present participle conking, simple past and past participle conked)

  1. (colloquial, often with out) To fail or show signs of failing, cease operating, break down, become unconscious.
    • 1921, Australian Aero Clubs, Sea, Land and Air, volume 3, page 310:
      Therefore, have two or more engines, so that there is still some power left if one engine conks.
    • 1983, Walli Leff and Marilyn Haft, Time without Work, page 93:
      I watch television when it's playing, but it done conked out. Everything is conked out.

ReferenceEdit

  1. ^ conk”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, launched 2000.

AnagramsEdit