See also: Cooper

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From coop +‎ -er.

NounEdit

cooper (countable and uncountable, plural coopers)

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
  1. A craftsman who makes and repairs barrels and similar wooden vessels such as casks, buckets and tubs.
    • 1851 November 14, Herman Melville, chapter 5, in Moby-Dick; or, The Whale, 1st American edition, New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers; London: Richard Bentley, OCLC 57395299:
      They were nearly all whalemen; chief mates, and second mates, and third mates, and sea carpenters, and sea coopers, and sea blacksmiths, and harpooneers, and ship keepers; a brown and brawny company, with bosky beards; an unshorn, shaggy set, all wearing monkey jackets for morning gowns.
  2. (obsolete) A drink of half stout and half porter.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

cooper (third-person singular simple present coopers, present participle coopering, simple past and past participle coopered)

  1. (now rare) To make and repair barrels etc.

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

cooper (plural coopers)

  1. Alternative form of coper (floating grog shop)

VerbEdit

cooper (third-person singular simple present coopers, present participle coopering, simple past and past participle coopered)

  1. Alternative form of coper (operate as floating grog shop)