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See also: cordé

Contents

FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French corde, from Old French corde, borrowed from Latin chorda (gut), from Ancient Greek χορδή (khordḗ, string of gut, cord).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kɔʁd/
  • (file)

NounEdit

corde f (plural cordes)

  1. rope (general)
  2. (geometry) chord
  3. (music) chord (of a string instrument)
  4. chord (vocal chord)
  5. line (washing line, for hanging clothes to dry)

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

corde

  1. first-person singular present indicative of corder
  2. third-person singular present indicative of corder
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of corder
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of corder
  5. second-person singular imperative of corder

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

corde (plural cordes)

  1. (anatomy) heart
  2. (figuratively) heart
  3. hearts (a suit of cards, )

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

corde f pl

  1. plural of corda

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

corde

  1. ablative singular of cor

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French corde, from Latin chorda, from Ancient Greek χορδά (khordá), χορδή (khordḗ).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɔrd(ə)/, /ˈkɔːrd(ə)/

NounEdit

corde (plural cordes)

  1. A long, thick length of fibre (often intertwined):
  2. One of the strings of a string instrument.
  3. A sinew or the muscular material one is made out of.
  4. A division of inherited property or goods.
  5. (rare) A nerve; a cable of bundled neurons.
  6. (rare) A method to torment captives using a cord.
  7. (rare) A whip made of multiple cords.

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French corde.

NounEdit

corde f (plural cordes)

  1. rope

DescendantsEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French corde, borrowed from Latin chorda (gut).

NounEdit

corde f (plural cordes)

  1. (Jersey) string, rope, line

Derived termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin chorda, from Ancient Greek χορδή (khordḗ).

NounEdit

corde f (oblique plural cordes, nominative singular corde, nominative plural cordes)

  1. rope

DescendantsEdit


TarantinoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare Italian corda.

NounEdit

corde

  1. rope