See also: Cordon and cordón

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English cordon, from Middle French cordon, diminutive of corde. More at cord.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kɔː(ɹ)dən/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(r)dən

NounEdit

cordon (plural cordons)

  1. (archaic) A ribbon normally worn diagonally across the chest as a decoration or insignia of rank etc. [from 17th c.]
  2. A line of people or things placed around an area to enclose or protect it. [from 16th c.]
  3. (cricket) The arc of fielders on the off side, behind the batsman - the slips and gully. [from 20th c.]
  4. (botany) A woody plant, such as a fruit tree, pruned and trained to grow as a single stem on a support. [from 19th c.]

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

cordon (third-person singular simple present cordons, present participle cordoning, simple past and past participle cordoned)

  1. Only used in cordon off

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French, equivalent to corde (rope) +‎ -on (diminutive suffix).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cordon m (plural cordons)

  1. cord (for connecting)

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • German: Kordon
  • Ottoman Turkish: قوردون
  • Polish: kordon
  • Portuguese: cordão
  • Romanian: cordon
  • Spanish: cordón

Further readingEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

corde (rope) +‎ -on (diminutive suffix)

NounEdit

cordon m (oblique plural cordons, nominative singular cordons, nominative plural cordon)

  1. bowstring
  2. A small piece of rope

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French cordon.

NounEdit

cordon n (plural cordoane)

  1. belt
  2. cord (length of twisted strands)
  3. cordon (line of people or things placed around an area to enclose or protect it)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit