Open main menu

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Onomatopoeic, from the sound made when a person runs while wearing daps.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dap (plural daps)

  1. (West Country, Somerset, Bristol, Wales, usually in the plural) A plimsoll.
    • 1988, Alan Hollinghurst, The Swimming Pool Library, Penguin Books (1988), page 169:
      I somehow expected them to shout obscenities, and was glad I had come ordinarily dressed, in a sports shirt, an old linen jacket, jeans and daps.

VerbEdit

dap (third-person singular simple present daps, present participle dapping, simple past and past participle dapped)

  1. (Bristol) To run or go somewhere quickly.
    I'll just dap down to the shop.
  2. (metalworking) To create a hollow indentation.
  3. (fishing) To drop the bait gently onto the surface of the water.

Etymology 2Edit

US 1971,[1] originally by black soldiers during the Vietnam war,[2] associated with Black Power movement. Originally an elaborate handshake, later specifically a fistbump.

Verb originally give dap. Presumably onomatopoeic,[3] or influenced by tap, dab,[4] etc. Alternatively, from earlier slang usage as abbreviation of dapper. Also explained as an acronym, such as “Dignity for Afro People”[5] or “Dignity And Pride”;[6] this may be a backronym or unrelated,[4] but accords with phrasal use as “give DAP” (compare “give respect”). More speculative etymologies derive it from Vietnamese đẹp (beautiful),[7] though this is unlikely.

NounEdit

dap (plural daps)

  1. (originally) Elaborate handshake, especially hooking thumbs.
    • 1971, London Magazine, Volume 11, p. 33:
      ... where many officers look the other way when blacks ‘give dap’ (the power shake) ...
    • 1972, Sepia, Volume 21, p. 80:
      These bloods just give dap just so they won't be called Uncle Toms.
  2. A fistbump.
    Synonym: dab

VerbEdit

dap (third-person singular simple present daps, present participle dapping, simple past and past participle dapped)

  1. To greet with a dap.

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Mark Jury, The Vietnam photo book (1971), p. 27
  2. ^ The Routledge Dictionary of Modern American Slang and Unconventional English, p. 271
  3. ^ dap” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Cassell's Dictionary of Slang, p. 383
  5. ^ Donald Kirk, Tell it to the Dead: Stories of a War (1975), p. 235
  6. ^ Hamilton, LaMont (2014). "Five on the Black Hand Side: Origins and Evolutions of the Dap." Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. Smithsonian Institution.
  7. ^ Encyclopedia of African American History, p. 1080

AnagramsEdit


RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

dap

  1. Informal form of da.

YolaEdit

NounEdit

dap

  1. tap, touch

ReferencesEdit

  • J. Poole W. Barnes, A Glossary, with Some Pieces of Verse, of the Old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy (1867)