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See also: țap, tập, TAP, and táp

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English tappe, from Old English tæppa, from Proto-Germanic *tappô. The verb is from Middle English tappen, from Old English tæppian, from Proto-Germanic *tappōną, from the noun.

NounEdit

 
A (bathroom) tap.

tap (plural taps)

  1. A tapering cylindrical pin or peg used to stop the vent in a cask; a spigot.
  2. A device used to dispense liquids.
    We don't have bottled water; you'll have to get it from the tap.
  3. Liquor drawn through a tap; hence, a certain kind or quality of liquor.
    a liquor of the same tap
  4. A place where liquor is drawn for drinking; a taproom; a bar.
  5. (mechanics) A device used to cut an internal screw thread. (External screw threads are cut with a die.)
    We drilled a hole and then cut the threads with the proper tap to match the valve's thread.
  6. A connection made to an electrical or fluid conductor without breaking it.
    The system was barely keeping pressure due to all of the ill-advised taps along its length.
  7. An interception of communication by authority.
  8. A device used to listen in secretly on telephone calls. [from 20th c.]
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

tap (third-person singular simple present taps, present participle tapping, simple past and past participle tapped)

  1. To furnish with taps.
    If we tap the maple trees, we can get maple syrup!
  2. To draw off liquid from a vessel.
    He tapped a new barrel of beer.
  3. To deplete, especially of a liquid via a tap; to tap out.
  4. To exploit.
    Businesses are trying to tap the youth market.
  5. To place a listening or recording device on a telephone or wired connection. [from 19th c.]
    They can't tap the phone without a warrant.
  6. To intercept a communication without authority.
    He was known to tap cable television
  7. (mechanical) To cut an internal screw thread.
    Tap an M3 thread all the way through the hole.
  8. (card games, board games) To turn or flip a card or playing piece to remind players that it has already been used that turn (by analogy to "tapping," in the sense of drawing on to the point of temporary exhaustion, the resources or abilities represented by the card).
  9. (informal) To cadge, borrow or beg.
    I tried to tap a cigarette off him, but he wouldn't give me one.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English tappen, teppen, from Old French tapper, taper (to tap), of Germanic origin, from Old Frankish *tappōn, *dabbōn (to strike) or from Middle Low German tappen, tapen ("to tap, rap, strike"); both ultimately from Proto-Germanic *dab- (to strike), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰAbʰ- (to beat, strike, stun, be speechless). Related to German tappen (to grope, fumble), Icelandic tappa, tapsa, tæpta (to tap). Related to dab.

VerbEdit

tap (third-person singular simple present taps, present participle tapping, simple past and past participle tapped)

  1. To strike lightly. [from early 13th c.]
  2. To touch one's finger, foot, or other body parts on a surface (usually) repeatedly.
    He was so nervous he began to tap his fingers on the table.
    She tapped her companion on the back to indicate that she was ready to go.
    Lydia tapped Jim on the shoulder to get his attention.
  3. To make a sharp noise.
    The tree, swaying in the breeze, began to tap on the window pane.
  4. To designate for some duty or for membership, as in 'a tap on the shoulder'. [from mid-20th c.]
  5. (slang, transitive) To have sexual intercourse with.
    I would tap that hot girl over there.
    I'd tap that.
  6. (combat sports) To submit to an opponent by tapping one's hand repeatedly.
  7. (combat sports, transitive) To force (an opponent) to submit.
    • 2000 October 14, "K®Æz¥ k ° †€°" (username), "Kimo Tapped Sakuraba", in alt.ufc, Usenet:
      Hard to believe Kimo [Leopoldo] used a triangle choke to tap [Kazushi] Sak[uraba], but 4 years can make a difference.
    • 2003 April 2, "Eddie" (username), "I Tapped Somebody!", in rec.martial-arts, Usenet:
      Just started bjj [=Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu] couple of months ago and i finally tapped someone!!! WOOOHOO! The guy i tapped has been traiing a few more months than me, outweighs me by at least 30 pounds, and is in great shape from the army.
    • 2004 April 7, "Araxen" (username), "Re: UFC vs. Boxing", in rec.sport.boxing, Usenet:
      [Genki] Sudo weighed 1/4 of what Butterbean [=Eric Esch] weighs and he still tapped Butterbean.
  8. To put a new sole or heel on.
    to tap shoes
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

NounEdit

tap (plural taps)

  1. A gentle or slight blow; a light rap; a pat.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Addison to this entry?)
    When Steve felt a tap on his shoulder, he turned around.
  2. tap dance
  3. (computing) The act of touching a touch screen.
  4. A piece of leather fastened upon the bottom of a boot or shoe in repairing or renewing the sole or heel; a heeltap.
  5. (military) A signal, by drum or trumpet, for extinguishing all lights in soldiers' quarters and retiring to bed; usually given about a quarter of an hour after tattoo.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of 1881, Thomas Wilhelm, "A Military Dictionary and Gazetteer" to this entry?)
  6. (phonetics) A consonant sound made by a single muscle contraction, such as the sound [ɾ] in the standard American English pronunciation of body.

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Onomatopoeia.

NounEdit

tap

  1. struck, hit

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tap m (plural taps)

  1. tap, spigot

DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Danish tapp.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtap/, [ˈtˢɑb̥]

NounEdit

tap c (singular definite tappen, plural indefinite tappe or tapper)

  1. (mechanics) protruding component of a device
  2. (anatomy) cone cell
  3. (informal) penis
  4. (erotic literature) clitoris

InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Acronym of teknisk-administrativt personale.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtap/, [ˈtˢɑb̥]

NounEdit

tap c (singular definite tap'en, plural indefinite tap'er)

  1. member of technical and administrative staff

InflectionEdit

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

tap

  1. imperative of tappe

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch tappe (closing pin, stopper), from Old Dutch *tappo, from Proto-Germanic *tappô.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tap m (plural tappen, diminutive tapje n)

  1. tap

Usage notesEdit

Although this term can be used to mean a tap from which water flows, this usage is rare; the more common term is kraan. It is most commonly used to refer to a beer tap.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From tapa (to lose).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tap n (genitive singular taps, nominative plural töp)

  1. loss, damage
    Búðin er rekin með tapi.
    The store is run at a loss.

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit


LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

tap

  1. rafsi of stapa.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tap n (definite singular tapet, indefinite plural tap, definite plural tapa or tapene)

  1. (a) loss

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tap n (definite singular tapet, indefinite plural tap, definite plural tapa)

  1. (a) loss, defeat

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit