See also: bait-

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English bayte, bait, beite, from Old Norse beita (food, bait), from Proto-Germanic *baitō (that which is bitten, bait), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to cleave, split, separate). Cognate with German Beize (mordant, corrosive fluid; marinade; hunting), Old English bāt (that which can be bitten, food, bait). Related to bite.

NounEdit

bait (countable and uncountable, plural baits)

  1. Any substance, especially food, used in catching fish, or other animals, by alluring them to a hook, snare, trap, or net.
  2. Food containing poison or a harmful additive to kill animals that are pests.
  3. Anything which allures; something used to lure or entice someone or something into doing something
    • 2017 June 7, Adam Lusher, “Adnan Khashoggi: the 'whoremonger' whose arms deals funded a playboy life of decadence and 'pleasure wives'”, in The Independent[1], London:
      One of the “girls” used in this way, Pamella Bordes, later spoke of being “part of an enormous group … used as sexual bait.”
  4. A portion of food or drink, as a refreshment taken on a journey; also, a stop for rest and refreshment.
    • 1817 December, [Jane Austen], chapter XX, in Northanger Abbey; published in Northanger Abbey: And Persuasion. [], volume (please specify |volume=I or II), London: John Murray, [], 1818, OCLC 318384910, page page 70:
      The tediousness of a two hours' bait at Petty-France, in which there was nothing to be done but to eat without being hungry, and loiter about without any thing to see, next followed[…]
    1. (Tyneside) A packed lunch.
    2. (East Anglia) A small meal taken mid-morning while farming.
    3. (Northern England) A miner's packed meal.
    4. A light or hasty luncheon.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
ReferencesEdit
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [2]
  • Frank Graham (1987) The New Geordie Dictionary, →ISBN
  • Northumberland Words, English Dialect Society, R. Oliver Heslop, 1893–4
  • Todd's Geordie Words and Phrases, George Todd, Newcastle, 1977[3]
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, →ISBN

VerbEdit

bait (third-person singular simple present baits, present participle baiting, simple past and past participle baited)

  1. (transitive) To attract with bait; to entice.
  2. (transitive) To affix bait to a trap or a fishing hook or fishing line.
TranslationsEdit
Usage notesEdit
  • This verb is sometimes confused in writing with the rare verb bate, which is pronounced identically; in particular, the expression with bated breath is frequently misspelled *with baited breath by writers unfamiliar with the verb bate.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English bayten, baiten, beiten, from Old Norse beita (to bait, cause to bite, feed, hunt), from Proto-Germanic *baitijaną (to cause to bite, bridle), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to cleave, split, separate). Cognate with Icelandic beita (to bait), Swedish beta (to bait, pasture, graze), German beizen (to cause to bite, bait), Old English bǣtan (to bait, hunt, bridle, bit).

VerbEdit

bait (third-person singular simple present baits, present participle baiting, simple past and past participle baited)

  1. (transitive) To set dogs on (an animal etc.) to bite or worry; to attack with dogs, especially for sport.
    to bait a bear with dogs;  to bait a bull
  2. (transitive) To intentionally annoy, torment, or threaten by constant rebukes or threats; to harass.
  3. (transitive, now rare) To feed and water (a horse or other animal), especially during a journey.
  4. (intransitive) (of a horse or other animal) To take food, especially during a journey.
    • 1603, Michel de Montaigne, chapter 22, in John Florio, transl., The Essayes [], book II, London: [] Val[entine] Simmes for Edward Blount [], OCLC 946730821:
      King Cyrus, that he might more speedily receave news from al parts of his Empire (which was of exceeding great length), would needs have it tried how far a horse could in a day goe outright without baiting, at which distance he caused stations to be set up, and men to have fresh horses ready for al such as came to him.
  5. (intransitive) (of a person) To stop to take a portion of food and drink for refreshment during a journey.
See alsoEdit

Etymology 3Edit

French battre de l'aile or des ailes, to flap or flutter.

VerbEdit

bait (third-person singular simple present baits, present participle baiting, simple past and past participle baited)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To flap the wings; to flutter as if to fly; or to hover, as a hawk when she stoops to her prey.

Etymology 4Edit

Etymology unknown.

AdjectiveEdit

bait (comparative baiter, superlative baitest)

  1. (MLE) Obvious; blatant.
    • 2008, “Power”, in Famous?, performed by Jamie "Jme" Adenuga and Tim Westwood:
      I've been at home all day / Cloning £50 notes, this is sick / But it's a bit bait / Cause all the serial numbers are the same / So I can't spend them in the same place
  2. (MLE) Well-known; famous; renowned.
SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CimbrianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German wīt, from Old High German wīt, from Proto-Germanic *wīdaz (wide, broad). Cognate with German weit, Dutch wijd, English wide, Icelandic víður.

AdjectiveEdit

bait (comparative baitor, superlative dar baitorste) (Sette Comuni, Luserna)

  1. wide, broad
    an baitar bèga wide road
    Dar bèg is bait.The road is wide.
  2. distant, far
    Synonym: vèrre

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • “bait” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

IndonesianEdit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

EtymologyEdit

From Malay bait, from Arabic بَيْت(bayt), from Proto-Semitic *bayt-.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈba.ɪt̪̚]
  • Hyphenation: ba‧it

NounEdit

bait (plural bait-bait, first-person possessive baitku, second-person possessive baitmu, third-person possessive baitnya)

  1. house (abode)
  2. home (house or structure in which someone lives)
  3. (literature) couplet (a pair of lines in poetry)
    Synonyms: untai, kuplet

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


MalayEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Arabic بَيْت(bayt), from Proto-Semitic *bayt-.

NounEdit

bait (Jawi spelling بيت‎, plural bait-bait, informal 1st possessive baitku, 2nd possessive baitmu, 3rd possessive baitnya)

  1. house (abode)
  2. home (house or structure in which someone lives)
  3. (literature) couplet (a pair of lines in poetry)
DescendantsEdit
  • Indonesian: bait

Etymology 2Edit

From English byte.

NounEdit

bait (Jawi spelling باءيت‎, plural bait-bait, informal 1st possessive baitku, 2nd possessive baitmu, 3rd possessive baitnya)

  1. byte

Further readingEdit


MarshalleseEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (phonetic) IPA(key): [pˠɑːitˠ], (enunciated) [pˠɑ itˠ]
  • (phonemic) IPA(key): /pˠæɰjitˠ/
  • Bender phonemes: {bahyit}

NounEdit

bait

  1. boxing

VerbEdit

bait

  1. hit
  2. punch

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

bait

  1. Alternative form of bayte

RomanianEdit

NounEdit

bait m (plural baiți)

  1. Alternative form of byte

DeclensionEdit


TagalogEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *bait. Compare Bikol Central buot, Cebuano buot, Malay baik, and Maori pai.

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: ba‧it
  • IPA(key): /baˈʔit/, [bɐˈʔit]

NounEdit

baít

  1. kindness
    Synonyms: kabaitan, kabutihang-loob, kagandahang-loob
  2. senses; clear state of mind
    Synonyms: sentido, sentido-komun, huwisyo, isip
  3. prudence; cautiousness
    Synonyms: timpi, pigil
  4. docility; domesticity

Derived termsEdit


WelshEdit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

bait

  1. (literary) second-person singular imperfect subjunctive of bod

SynonymsEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
bait fait mait unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.