Last modified on 29 May 2015, at 09:54

centum

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin centum (hundred). Its use in linguistics is due to it being a canonical example of a word retaining an original velar stop, as opposed to Avestan 𐬯𐬀𐬙𐬆𐬨 (satəm).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɛntəm/ (Indo-European linguistics)
  • IPA(key): /ˈsɛntəm/ (exam score)

AdjectiveEdit

centum (not comparable)

  1. (Indo-European linguistics) referring to an Indo-European language that did not produce sibilants from a series of Proto-Indo-European palatovelar stops.

AntonymsEdit

  • (Indo-European linguistics): satem

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

centum

  1. (India) A perfect score on a board exam.

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

centum (invariable)

  1. used only in the term lingua centum

LatinEdit

Latin cardinal numbers
 <  XCIX C CI  > 
    Cardinal : centum
    Ordinal : centēsimus
    Adverbial : centiēns
    Multiplier : centumplex
    Distributive : centēnī
Latin Wikipedia article on centum

Alternative formsEdit

  • Symbol: C

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *kentom, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱm̥tóm. Formal cognates include Sanskrit शत (śata), Old Church Slavonic съто (sŭto) and Old English hund.

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

centum (indeclinable)

  1. (cardinal) a hundred; 100
    • c. 37 BCE – 30 BCE, Virgil, Georgicon 4.381
      Simul ipsa precatur Oceanumque patrem rerum Nymphasque sorores centum quae silvas, centum quae flumina servant.
      Together she entreats father Ocean, and the sister-nymphs who guard a hundred forests and a hundred streams.

Usage notesEdit

The numeral centum behaves like an indeclinable adjective. See Appendix:Latin cardinal numbers for additional information.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit