Open main menu

Wiktionary β

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin dictātus, perfect passive participle of dictō (pronounce or declare repeatedly; dictate), frequentative of dīcō (say, speak).

PronunciationEdit

Noun

Verb

NounEdit

dictate (plural dictates)

  1. An order or command.
    I must obey the dictates of my conscience.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

dictate (third-person singular simple present dictates, present participle dictating, simple past and past participle dictated)

  1. To order, command, control.
    • 2001, Sydney I. Landau, Dictionaries: The Art and Craft of Lexicography, Cambridge University Press ISBN 0-521-78512-X, page 409,
      Trademark Owners will nevertheless try to dictate how their marks are to be represented, but dictionary publishers with spine can resist such pressure.
  2. To speak in order for someone to write down the words.
    She is dictating a letter to a stenographer.
    The French teacher dictated a passage from Victor Hugo.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

dictāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of dictātus