Middle Irish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Irish do·beir.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

do·beir (prototonic ·tabair, verbal noun tabairt)

  1. to bring, take
    • c. 1000, Anonymous, published in (1935) Rudolf Thurneysen, editor, Scéla Mucca Meic Dathó (in Middle Irish), Dublin: Staionery Office, § 1, l. 13–14, page 2:In fer no·t⟨h⟩ēged iarsint ṡligi do·bered in n-aēl isin coiri, ocus a·taibred din chētgabāil, iss ed no·ithed. Mani·tucad immurgu ní din chéttadall ni·bered a n-aill.Each man who came along the passage would put the flesh-fork into the cauldron, and whatever he took at the first grabbing, it was that which he ate. If, however, he did not take anything at (literally from) his first thrust, he did not bring the second.
  2. to give
  3. to place, put
    • c. 1000, Anonymous, published in (1935) Rudolf Thurneysen, editor, Scéla Mucca Meic Dathó (in Middle Irish), Dublin: Staionery Office, § 1, l. 13, page 2:In fer no·t⟨h⟩ēged iarsint ṡligi do·bered in n-aēl isin coiri, ocus a·taibred din chētgabāil, iss ed no·ithed.Each man who came along the passage would put the flesh-fork into the cauldron, and whatever he brought (out) at the first taking, it was that which he ate. (literally, “The man who…”)

Conjugation edit

  • Third-person singular imperfect indicative deuterotonic: do·bered
  • Third-person singular past subjunctive prototonic: ·taibred

Perfective forms derived from do·uic (bring)

  • Third-person singular imperfect indicative prototonic: ·tucad

Descendants edit

  • Irish: bheir, tabhair
  • Manx: ver, toyr
  • Scottish Gaelic: bheir, tabhair, thoir

Mutation edit

Middle Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
do·beir do·beir
pronounced with /-β(ʲ)-/
do·mbeir
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading edit

Old Irish edit

Etymology edit

From to- +‎ beirid.

The perfective form do·rat is from to- +‎ ro- +‎ ad- + Proto-Celtic *dāti, from Proto-Indo-European *déh₃t (to give).[1]

The perfective form do·uic is originally a causative to make something arrive of do·icc (to come).[2] These forms may become conflated with the unrelated verb do·ucai (to understand) and in some contexts it may be unclear which of the two verbs is intended.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

do·beir (prototonic ·tabair, verbal noun tabairt)

  1. to bring
    • c. 850-875, Turin Glosses and Scholia on St Mark, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 484–94, Tur. 110c
      Ba bés leusom do·bertis dá boc leu dochum tempuil, ⁊ no·léicthe indala n‑ái fon díthrub co pecad in popuil, ⁊ do·bertis maldachta foir, ⁊ n⟨o⟩·oircthe didiu and ó popul tar cenn a pecthae ind aile.
      It was a custom with them that two he-goats were brought by them to the temple, and one of the two of them was let go to the wilderness with the sin of the people, and curses were put upon him, and thereupon the other was slain there by the people for their sins.
  2. to give
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 13b15
      Is gúḟorcell do·beram do Día amal ṡodin.
      It is false testimony that we give to God in that case.
  3. to place, put
    • c. 845, St Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 63a17
      Amal nád ṅdéni neutur dindí as Tiberis cía do·berthar flumen friss, síc ní déni neutur dindí as Suthul ci ad·comaltar oppidum friss.
      As it does not make a neuter of [that which is] Tiberis that flumen is put with it, so it does not make a neuter of [that which is] Suthul, that oppidum is conjoined to it.
  4. to inflict (punishment)
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 42a4
      Ní·guid dígail du thabairt foraib, acht corru·anat inna arrad.
      He prays not that punishment should be inflicted on them, but that they may remain in his company.

For more quotations using this term, see Citations:dobeir.

Conjugation edit

Perfective forms derived from do·rat ("give, put")
Perfective forms derived from do·uic ("bring")

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

Mutation edit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
do·beir do·beir
pronounced with /-β(ʲ)-/
do·mbeir
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References edit

  1. ^ Schumacher, Stefan, Schulze-Thulin, Britta (2004) “Urinselkelt. *dā- 'geben'”, in Die keltischen Primärverben: ein vergleichendes, etymologisches und morphologisches Lexikon [The Celtic Primary Verbs: A comparative, etymological and morphological lexicon] (Innsbrucker Beiträge zur Sprachwissenschaft; 110) (in German), Innsbruck: Institut für Sprachen und Literaturen der Universität Innsbruck, →ISBN, page 265
  2. ^ Rix, Helmut, editor (2001), “*h₂nek̑-”, in Lexikon der indogermanischen Verben [Lexicon of Indo-European Verbs] (in German), 2nd edition, Wiesbaden: Dr. Ludwig Reichert Verlag, →ISBN, pages 282-84

Further reading edit