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EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Hindi ठग्गी, ठगी, ठग ‎(ṭhaggī, ṭhagī, ṭhag), from Marathi ठक ‎(ṭhak, thief, swindler), from Sanskrit स्थग ‎(sthaga, cunning, fraudulent, to cover, to conceal) hence स्थगति ‎(sthagati, he/she/it covers, he/she/it conceals), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)teg- ‎(to cover with a roof). Thuggee was an Indian network of secret fraternities who were engaged in murdering and robbing travellers and known for strangling their victims, operating from the 17th century (possibly as early as 13th century) to the 19th century. During British Imperial rule of India, many Indian words passed into common English, and in 1810 thug referred to members of these Indian gangs. The sense was adopted more generally as "ruffian, cutthroat" by 1839. See also English thatch, deck.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

thug ‎(plural thugs)

  1. Someone with an intimidating and unseemly appearance and mannerisms, who treats others violently and roughly, often for hire.
  2. (historical) One of a band of assassins formerly active in northern India who worshipped Kali and offered their victims to her.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

thug ‎(third-person singular simple present thugs, present participle thugging, simple past and past participle thugged)

  1. To commit acts of thuggery, to live the life of a thug, or to dress and act in a manner reminiscent of someone who does.

IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

thug

  1. past indicative analytic of tabhair

Scottish GaelicEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

thug

  1. past tense of thoir

Usage notesEdit

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