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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

By ellipsis.

NounEdit

doner (plural doners)

  1. doner kebab

Etymology 2Edit

From done +‎ -er. Compare goner.

NounEdit

doner

  1. (Dublin slang) Goner; someone who is done for.
    • 1922 (1984), James Joyce, Ulysses, page 86:
      One whiff of that and you're a doner.

Etymology 3Edit

From done +‎ -er (comparative suffix).

AdjectiveEdit

doner

  1. (humorous, dialectal) comparative form of done: more done
    • 1999 March 10, “WHAT'S THE BEEF ?”, in Richmond Times-Dispatch:
      With these cuts we generally recommend cooking no doner than medium-rare for a juicier product
    • 2007 June 3, “Suddenly, the field is level”, in Austin American-Statesman:
      Doner than a flank steak at a West Texas truck stop. Doner than Michael Vick's chances at next year's NFL citizenship award
    • 2008, Porochista Khakpour, Sons and Other Flammable Objects, page 228:
      they feared sounding stupid even to themselves out loud—and besides, the conversation was doner than done to them

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Norwegian BokmålEdit

VerbEdit

doner

  1. imperative of donere

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin donāre, present active infinitive of dōnō. Compare Old Occitan donar.

VerbEdit

doner

  1. to give

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. This verb has irregularities in its conjugation. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle French: donner
    • French: donner
      • Romanian: dona
  • Norman: donner
  • Picard: donner
  • Walloon: dner, diner

ReferencesEdit

  • “Appendix E: Irregular Verbs” in E. Einhorn (1974), Old French: A Concise Handbook, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 153