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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Afrikaans donder (thrash), from Dutch donder (thunder). Doublet of thunder.

VerbEdit

donner (third-person singular simple present donners, present participle donnering, simple past and past participle donnered)

  1. (South Africa, slang) To beat up; clobber; thrash.
    • 2005, Al Lovejoy, Acid Alex, Zebra Press (2005), →ISBN, page 167:
      They went into the pub and started a fight. One that was just bad enough for someone to call the boere. When the gattas arrived they got donnered for their trouble.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French donner, from Old French doner, from Latin dōnāre, present active infinitive of dōnō.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dɔ.ne/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

donner

  1. to give, to transfer the possession/holding of something to someone else.
  2. to donate
  3. (intransitive) To come across
    • 1837, Louis Viardot, L’Ingénieux Hidalgo Don Quichotte de la Manchefr.Wikisource, translation of El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Chapter I:
      Finalement, ayant perdu l’esprit sans ressource, il vint à donner dans la plus étrange pensée dont jamais fou se fût avisé dans le monde.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
      Finally, having lost his mind completely, he happened to come across the strangest thought in the world of which a crazy person ever conceived.

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Romanian: dona

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

VerbEdit

donner

  1. First-person singular present of donnern.
  2. Imperative singular of donnern.

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French doner, from Latin dōnō, dōnāre.

VerbEdit

donner

  1. to give

ConjugationEdit

  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

DescendantsEdit


NormanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French doner, from Latin dōnō, dōnāre (give a present; bestow, grant), from dōnum (gift, present).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

donner

  1. (Jersey) to give
  2. (Jersey, card games) to deal

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


PicardEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French doner, from Latin dōnāre, present active infinitive of dōnō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

donner

  1. to give, to transfer the possession/holding of something to someone else.
  2. to donate
    Il o donnè à l’tchète à chl'église.
    He donated at the church

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit


ScotsEdit

VerbEdit

donner (third-person singular present donners, present participle donnerin, past donnert, past participle donnert)

  1. to stun, shock, stupefy
    • 1879, Mrs. Finlay Cameron, The Auld Hoose: Glimpses of Scottish Life, The Edinburgh Publishing Company (1879), page 69:
      "Doited or no doited, it's a fact thae hae queer daein's aboot thae toons. I haena seen mony o' them; but as for Glasgow, it quite donnered me; and Edinburgh wasna muckle better. []

ReferencesEdit