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EnglishEdit

 
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Examples (grammar)
  • He is faster than she. (Here, a trailing “is fast” is omitted, grammatically required, and implied.)
  • She went home, so I did, too. (Did stands for “went home”.)

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ellipsis, from Ancient Greek ἔλλειψις (élleipsis, omission). Doublet of ellipse.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ellipsis (countable and uncountable, plural ellipses)

  1. (typography) A mark consisting of three periods, historically with spaces in between, before, and after them “ . . . ”, nowadays a single character “” Ellipses are used to indicate that words have been omitted in a text or that they are missing or illegible.
    Synonym: dot dot dot
    • 2006, Danielle Corsetto, Girls with Slingshots: 114
      CARD: Hey Baby. Thanks for the … last night. Love you!
      HAZEL: Wow. I’ve never despised an ellipsis so much in my life.
  2. (grammar, rhetoric) The omission of a word or phrase that can be inferred from the context.
  3. (film) The omission of scenes in a film that do not advance the plot.
    • 2002, David Blanke, The 1910s: 219
      It was now possible for writers and directors to cut scenes that did not further the plot; called "ellipses" by filmmakers.
  4. (obsolete, geometry) An ellipse.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Punctuation


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek ἔλλειψις (élleipsis, omission)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ellīpsis f (genitive ellīpsis); third declension

  1. ellipsis
  2. ellipse

InflectionEdit

Third declension i-stem.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative ellīpsis ellīpsēs
Genitive ellīpsis ellīpsium
Dative ellīpsī ellīpsibus
Accusative ellīpsin
ellīpsim
ellīpsēs
Ablative ellīpsī ellīpsibus
Vocative ellīpsis ellīpsēs

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit