See also: douché

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French douche(shower), from Italian doccia(shower).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

douche ‎(plural douches)

  1. A jet or current of water or vapour directed upon some part of the body to benefit it medicinally; in particular, such a jet directed at the vagina for vaginal irrigation.
    • 1892 Robert Ottiwell Gifford-Bennet, Buxton and its Medicinal Waters, London: John Heywood, [1]
      Massage, or kneading of the whole body, is carried out in this bath after which a steam douche or a warm spray is turned upon the affected parts, according to the nature of the case.
    • 1898 Selma Lagerlöf (trans. Pauline Bancroft Flach), The Story of Gösta Berling, Boston: Little, Brown, and Company, Part II, Chapter I, p. 249 [[2]]
      Earth, the great mother, begins to live. Romping like a child she rises from her bath in the spring floods, from her douche in the spring rain.
    • 1973 Jaroslav Hašek (trans. Cecil Parrott), The Good Soldier Švejk, London: William Heinemann, Chapter 4, p. 32,
      In the bathroom they immersed him in a tub of warm water, and then pulled him out and put him under a cold douche.
  2. Something that produces the jet or current in the previous sense, such as a syringe.
  3. (slang, derogatory) A contemptible person; a worthless, brainless or disgusting person. (Earlier douche bag.)
    • 1991 Anthrax, "Startin' Up a Posse", from album Attack of the Killer B's (song lyrics)
      You say our records are offensive, (You're a douche, you're a douche.)

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

douche ‎(third-person singular simple present douches, present participle douching, simple past and past participle douched)

  1. To administer a douche to; to shower; to douse
    • 1926, D. H. Lawrence, The Plumed Serpent, New York: Knopf, Chapter II,
      [] a frizzy half-white woman who looked as if she had fallen into a flour-sack, her face was so deep in powder, and her frizzy hair and her brown silk dress so douched with the white dust of it.
    • 1938, Xavier Herbert, Capricornia, Chapter VI, p. 81, [3]
      Mrs. McLash's anger was gone completely, douched not nearly so much by the beer as by this attention to her son.
    • 1992, Edna O'Brien, Time and Tide, New York: Farrar Straus Giroux, Chapter 9, p. 66,
      The boxes would reek of the smell of rich plum cake, with brandy or sherry douched over it.
    • 2007, Valerie Allen, On Farting: Language and Laughter in the Middle Ages, New York: Palgrave MacMillan, p. 153,
      Tragedy acts then like a laxative [] or an aperient [] to douche our systems of humors and emotions that unbalance the soul, so that we may return to the virtuous golden mean, to homeostatic equilibrium.
  2. To use a douche.

TranslationsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French douche(shower), from Italian doccia(shower). See also does(shower head).

NounEdit

douche m, f ‎(plural douches, diminutive doucheje n)

  1. shower

VerbEdit

douche

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of douchen

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Italian doccia.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

douche f ‎(plural douches)

  1. shower
  2. (juggling) shower

VerbEdit

douche

  1. first-person singular present indicative of doucher
  2. third-person singular present indicative of doucher
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of doucher
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of doucher
  5. second-person singular imperative of doucher

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

DescendantsEdit

External linksEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French douche, from Italian doccia.

NounEdit

douche f ‎(plural douches)

  1. (Jersey) shower