See also: duś, dús, dûs, duș, duş, đus, D'us, düş, and Duś

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dus

  1. second-person singular imperative of dusit

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the pronoun du, under the influence of the obsolete verb duse (to address informally), which was borrowed from German duzen.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dus (uninflected)

  1. (largely historical) in a relationship that would warrant use of the informal du, as opposed to the formal De
  2. (by extension) familiar with
    • 2016, Gustav Wied, Livsens ondskab, Lindhardt og Ringhof →ISBN
      Men Landbruget? spurgte Degnen, der jo havde været Dus med Vorherre i femogtyve Aar, baade Hellig og Søgn og derfor tog ham med forholdsvis Ro
      But the farming? the deacon asked, who, as is known, has been intimate with our lord in twenty-five years, on the holidays as on the everydays, and who therefore took him with relative calm
    • 2016, Lars Daneskov, Far på færde, Politikens Forlag →ISBN
      Jeg kender mænd, der i perioder har kunnet samtlige tilbud i TV-Shop udenad og været dus med hovedpersonerne i enhver australsk sitcom sendt på en kabelkanal om natten.
      I know men who, in periods, have known all offers in TV-Shop by rote and been highly familiar with the protagonists in each Australian sitcom sent on a cable-channel in the night.
    • 1982, Det Danske bogmarked
      De fleste af vore seriøse forlag er eller har været mere end dus med begrebet.
      Most of our serious publishers are or have been more than familiar with the concept.
    • 2011, Jesper Kaae, Gratis CMS med Joomla (2. udg), Libris Media A/S →ISBN, page 81
      Og faktisk skal du også helst være dus med et billedredigeringsprogram som f. eks. Photoshop.
      And in fact, you should, preferably, be familiar with an image editor like Photoshop.

Usage notesEdit

The formal De is all but abandoned outside of certain very impersonal contexts, and using du is never rude.

AdverbEdit

dus

  1. in the phrase drikke dus, "to introduce an informal relationship".

Coordinate termsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch dos, dus, from Old Dutch thus, from Proto-West Germanic *þus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dʏs/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: dus
  • Rhymes: -ʏs

AdverbEdit

dus

  1. so, therefore, thus, ergo

Usage notesEdit

Dus is an unusual adverb in that it does not trigger mandatory inversion when it is placed at the front of a clause, instead inversion is optional: dus zij is beter and dus is zij beter are both correct as fronted variants of zij is dus beter.

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: dus
  • Indonesian: dus

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dus

  1. first-person singular past historic of devoir
  2. second-person singular past historic of devoir

VerbEdit

dus m pl

  1. masculine plural of the past participle of devoir

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /duːs/
  • Hyphenation: dus

ContractionEdit

dus

  1. Contraction of du es.
    • 1843, Brothers Grimm, “Der Froschkönig oder der eiserne Heinrich”, in Kinder- und Haus-Märchen, Band 1[1], 5th edition, page 3-4:
      „Königstochter, jüngste, mach mir auf, weißt du nicht was gestern du zu mir gesagt bei dem kühlen Brunnenwasser? Königstochter, jüngste, mach mir auf.“ Da sagte der König „hast dus versprochen, so mußt dus auch halten; geh nur und mach ihm auf.“
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Guinea-Bissau CreoleEdit

Guinea-Bissau Creole cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : dus

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese dois. Cognate with Kabuverdianu dos.

NumeralEdit

dus

  1. two (2)

IndonesianEdit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈdʊs]
  • Hyphenation: dus

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch doos (box). Doublet of dosis.

NounEdit

dus (first-person possessive dusku, second-person possessive dusmu, third-person possessive dusnya)

  1. box.
    Synonym: kardus

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch dus (thus).

ParticleEdit

dus

  1. (colloquial) thus, so.
    Synonym: jadi

Etymology 3Edit

From Dutch douche (shower).

NounEdit

dus (first-person possessive dusku, second-person possessive dusmu, third-person possessive dusnya)

  1. (colloquial) shower, a device for bathing by which water is made to fall on the body from a height, either from a tank or by the action of a pump.

Further readingEdit


LatvianEdit

VerbEdit

dus

  1. 3rd person singular present indicative form of dusēt
  2. 3rd person plural present indicative form of dusēt
  3. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of dusēt
  4. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of dusēt

Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch thus, from Proto-Germanic *þus.

AdverbEdit

dus

  1. thus, in this way
  2. therefore

Alternative formsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • dus”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “dus”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN

MiskitoEdit

NounEdit

dus

  1. tree

NormanEdit

VerbEdit

dus

  1. first-person singular preterite of d'ver

Northern SamiEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈtuːs/

PronounEdit

dūs

  1. locative of don

Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From du (you (singular)), influenced by dus (Etymology 2).

AdjectiveEdit

dus (singular and plural dus)

  1. (about interpersonal relationships) having sufficient lack of formal distance
    1. (originally) Being on terms where one may address each other with the 2nd person pronoun du, as opposed to the historically more formal De.
    2. Familiar, intimate
    3. Informal

AntonymsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

dus m

  1. inflection of duc:
    1. oblique plural
    2. nominative singular

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Past participle of duce.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dus n (uncountable)

  1. departure

DeclensionEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dus m or n (feminine singular dusă, masculine plural duși, feminine and neuter plural duse)

  1. someone who has left and will not come back
  2. dead
  3. absent-minded
  4. crazy

DeclensionEdit

VerbEdit

dus (past participle of duce)

  1. past participle of duce

RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Puter, Vallader) duos

EtymologyEdit

From Latin duōs, masculine accusative of duo.

NumeralEdit

dus m (feminine duas)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) two

Usage notesEdit

Only Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, and Sutsilvan have a separate feminine form; in Surmiran, dus is epicene.


WestrobothnianEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse dús.

NounEdit

dus n

  1. Roaring, whizzing, noise (of water or wind.)

AdjectiveEdit

dus

  1. Bold, enterprising.