current

See also: Current

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English curraunt, borrowed from Old French curant (French courant), present participle of courre (to run), from Latin currere, present active infinitive of currō (I run) (present participle currens). Doublet of courant.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

current (countable and uncountable, plural currents)

  1. The generally unidirectional movement of a gas or fluid.
  2. the part of a fluid that moves continuously in a certain direction, especially (oceanography) short for ocean current.
    Synonyms: flow, stream
  3. (electricity) the time rate of flow of electric charge.
    • Symbol: I (inclined upper case letter "I")
    • Units:
    SI: ampere (A)
    CGS: esu/second (esu/s)
    Synonym: electric current
  4. a tendency or a course of events
    Synonyms: flow, stream, tendency

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

AdjectiveEdit

current (comparative currenter or more current, superlative currentest or most current)

  1. existing or occurring at the moment
    • 2013 July 19, Timothy Garton Ash, “Where Dr Pangloss meets Machiavelli”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 18:
      Hidden behind thickets of acronyms and gorse bushes of detail, a new great game is under way across the globe. Some call it geoeconomics, but it's geopolitics too. The current power play consists of an extraordinary range of countries simultaneously sitting down to negotiate big free trade and investment agreements.
    current events;  current leaders;  current negotiations
    Synonyms: present; see also Thesaurus:present
    Antonyms: future, past
  2. generally accepted, used, practiced, or prevalent at the moment
    • (Can we date this quote by Arbuthnot and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      That there was current money in Abraham's time is past doubt.
    • 2013 June 22, “T time”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8841, page 68:
      The ability to shift profits to low-tax countries by locating intellectual property in them [] is often assumed to be the preserve of high-tech companies. [] current tax rules make it easy for all sorts of firms to generate [] “stateless income”: profit subject to tax in a jurisdiction that is neither the location of the factors of production that generate the income nor where the parent firm is domiciled.
    current affairs;  current bills and coins;  current fashions
    Synonyms: fashionable, prevailing, prevalent, rife, up-to-date; see also Thesaurus:fashionable
    Antonyms: out-of-date, unfashionable; see also Thesaurus:unfashionable
  3. (obsolete) running or moving rapidly
    • (Can we date this quote by Gower and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Like the current fire, that renneth / Upon a cord.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Merlin and Vivien
      To chase a creature that was current then / In these wild woods, the hart with golden horns.
    Synonym: speeding

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

current

  1. third-person plural future active indicative of currō