See also: Jet and jeț

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dʒɛt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛt

Etymology 1Edit

 
A MiG-17 jet.

Borrowed from French jet (spurt, literally a throw), from Old French get, giet, from Vulgar Latin *iectus, jectus, from Latin iactus (a throwing, a throw), from iacere (to throw). See abject, ejaculate, gist, jess, jut. Cognate with Spanish echar.

NounEdit

jet (plural jets)

  1. A collimated stream, spurt or flow of liquid or gas from a pressurized container, an engine, etc.
  2. A spout or nozzle for creating a jet of fluid.
  3. (aviation) A type of airplane using jet engines rather than propellers.
  4. An engine that propels a vehicle using a stream of fluid as propulsion.
    1. A turbine.
    2. A rocket engine.
  5. A part of a carburetor that controls the amount of fuel mixed with the air.
  6. (physics) A narrow cone of hadrons and other particles produced by the hadronization of a quark or gluon.
  7. (dated) Drift; scope; range, as of an argument.
  8. (printing, dated) The sprue of a type, which is broken from it when the type is cold[1].
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

jet (third-person singular simple present jets, present participle jetting, simple past and past participle jetted)

  1. (intransitive) To spray out of a container.
  2. (transitive) To spray with liquid from a container.
    Farmers may either dip or jet sheep with chemicals.
  3. (intransitive) To travel on a jet aircraft or otherwise by jet propulsion
  4. (intransitive) To move (running, walking etc.) rapidly around
  5. To shoot forward or out; to project; to jut out.
  6. To strut; to walk with a lofty or haughty gait; to be insolent; to obtrude.
  7. To jerk; to jolt; to be shaken.
    • 1719, Richard Wiseman, Serjeant-Chirurgeon to King Charles II, Eight Chirurgical Treatises, London: B. Tooke et al., 5th edition, Volume 2, Book 5, Chapter 4, p. 78,[1]
      A Lady was wounded down the whole Length of the Forehead to the Nose [] It happened to her travelling in a Hackney-Coach, upon the jetting whereof she was thrown out of the hinder Seat against a Bar of Iron in the forepart of the Coach.
  8. To adjust the fuel to air ratio of a carburetor; to install or adjust a carburetor jet
    • 1970, Bill Fisher, How to Hotrod Volkswagen Engines[2], page 30:
      The cure is to jet the carburetor excessively rich so that the mixture will be correct at the top end, but this richens the curve throughout the RPM range.
  9. (slang, intransitive) To leave; depart.
    Gotta jet. See you tomorrow.
TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

jet (not comparable)

  1. Propelled by turbine engines.
    jet airplane
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

 
A small (about 15mm long) sample of jet.

From Middle English get, geet, gete, from a northern form of Old French jayet, jaiet, gaiet, from Latin gagātēs, from Ancient Greek Γαγάτης (Gagátēs), from Γάγας (Gágas, a town and river in Lycia). Doublet of gagate.

NounEdit

jet (plural jets)

  1. (mineralogy) A hard, black form of coal, sometimes used in jewellery.
    Hypernyms: lignite, mineraloid
    • 1735, [John Barrow], “JEAT”, in Dictionarium Polygraphicum: Or, The Whole Body of Arts Regularly Digested. [...], volume II (I–S), London: [] C[harles] Hitch and C[harles] Davis [], and S[amuel] Austen [], OCLC 987025732:
      There is also a factitious jeat made of glaſs, in imitation of the mineral jeat.
  2. (color) The colour of jet coal, deep grey.
    jet:  
Alternative formsEdit
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • German: Jett
TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

jet (comparative jetter or more jet, superlative jettest or most jet)

  1. Very dark black in colour.
    Synonym: jet-black
    • 1901, Franklin Beech, The Dyeing of Cotton Fabrics: A Practical Handbook for the Dyer and Student:
      All the direct blacks require working in strong baths to give anything like black shades; they all have, more or less, a bluish tone, which can be changed to a jetter shade by the addition of a yellow or green dye in small proportions, which has been done in one of the recipes given above.
    • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, Penguin 2011, p. 23:
      She was an ash blonde with greenish eyes, beaded lashes, hair waved smoothly back from ears in which large jet buttons glittered.
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 1874, Edward H. Knight, American Mechanical Dictionary

AnagramsEdit


Central FranconianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German iowiht, from io (always) + wiht (thing) << Proto-West Germanic *wihti.

Cognate with Middle Dutch iewet, iet (whence Limburgish get, contemporary Dutch iets), English aught.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

jet (indefinite)

  1. (Ripuarian, northernmost Moselle Franconian) something; anything
    Luur ens, ich hann der jet metjebraht.
    Look, I’ve brought you something.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit


CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *ěxati, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ey-.[1]

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

jet impf

  1. to ride
  2. to go (by vehicle)

Usage notesEdit

Jet is in the class of Czech concrete verbs. Its counterpart, jezdit, is an abstract verb.

ConjugationEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "jet" in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, electronic version, Leda, 2007

Further readingEdit

  • jeti in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • jeti in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French get, giet, from a Vulgar Latin *iectus, jectus, an alteration of Latin iactus (a throwing, throw).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jet m (plural jets)

  1. throw
  2. spurt, spout, jet
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: jet

Further readingEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From English jet (airplane).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jet m (plural jets)

  1. jet (airplane)

Further readingEdit


FriulianEdit

NounEdit

jet m (plural jets)

  1. bed

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

jet

  1. Alternative form of get (jet)

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin iactus.

NounEdit

jet

  1. throw

DescendantsEdit

  • Anglo-Norman: jet
  • French: jet
    • English: jet

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French jet.

NounEdit

jet n (plural jeturi)

  1. jet (of a gas of liquid)

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unadapted borrowing from English jet.

PronunciationEdit

 
  • IPA(key): (everywhere but Argentina and Uruguay) /ˈʝet/, [ˈɟ͡ʝet̪]
  • IPA(key): (Buenos Aires and environs) /ˈʃet/, [ˈʃet̪]
  • IPA(key): (elsewhere in Argentina and Uruguay) /ˈʒet/, [ˈʒet̪]

NounEdit

jet m (plural jets)

  1. jet

Further readingEdit