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Wiktionary β

See also: dục and đực

Contents

AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ducō. Compare Daco-Romanian duce, duc.

VerbEdit

duc (third-person singular present indicative dutsi/dutse, past participle dusã)

  1. I carry.
  2. (reflexive, mi-duc) I go.

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

duc m (plural ducs, feminine duquessa)

  1. duke (ruler of a duchy)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Non-lemma forms.

VerbEdit

duc

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of dur

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French duc, from Old French duc, borrowed from Latin dux, ducem, from dūcō, dūcere (lead, guide), from Proto-Indo-European *dewk-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

duc m (plural ducs)

  1. duke (nobleman)

Further readingEdit


LadinEdit

EtymologyEdit

See dut.

PronounEdit

duc

  1. all; everybody, everyone

LatinEdit

Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French duc.

NounEdit

duc (plural ducs)

  1. duke (nobleman)

DescendantsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French duc.

NounEdit

duc m (plural ducs)

  1. duke (nobleman)

DescendantsEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French duc, borrowed from Latin dux, ducem, from dūcō, dūcere (lead, guide), from Proto-Indo-European *dewk-.

NounEdit

duc m (plural ducs)

  1. (Jersey) duke

Coordinate termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin dux, ducem.

NounEdit

duc m (oblique plural dus, nominative singular dus, nominative plural duc)

  1. duke (nobleman)

DescendantsEdit


Old ProvençalEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin dux, ducem.

NounEdit

duc m (oblique plural ducs, nominative singular ducs, nominative plural duc)

  1. duke (nobleman)

RomanianEdit