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See also: Doge

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Wikipedia has an article on:
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Andrea Gritti, Doge of Venice (1523-1538)

Etymology 1Edit

From Venetian or Italian doge, from Latin ducem, accusative of dux (leader, prince).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

doge (plural doges or dogi)

  1. (historical) The chief magistrate in the republics of Venice and Genoa.
    • 1797, John Adams, A Defence of the Constitutions of Government of the United States, page 62
      In the thirteenth century, a new method of appointing the doge, by the famous ballot of Venice, a complicated mixture of choice and chance, was adopted.
    • 1982, John Julius Norwich, A History of Venice, chapter 34, page 346
      This reply was one of the first important pronouncements to be made by Antonio Grimani, who on 6 July had been elected seventy-fourth Doge of Venice in succession to Leonardo Loredan.
QuotationsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

doge (plural doges)

  1. (Internet slang, humorous) Alternative form of dog

FinnishEdit

NounEdit

doge

  1. doge

DeclensionEdit

In genitive plural, non-standard dogien seems to be the most commonly used form.

Inflection of doge (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
nominative doge doget
genitive dogen dogejen
partitive dogea dogeja
illative dogeen dogeihin
singular plural
nominative doge doget
accusative nom. doge doget
gen. dogen
genitive dogen dogejen
dogeinrare
partitive dogea dogeja
inessive dogessa dogeissa
elative dogesta dogeista
illative dogeen dogeihin
adessive dogella dogeilla
ablative dogelta dogeilta
allative dogelle dogeille
essive dogena dogeina
translative dogeksi dogeiksi
instructive dogein
abessive dogetta dogeitta
comitative dogeineen

FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

From Venetian doge, from Latin ducem, accusative of dux (leader, prince).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

doge m (plural doges)

  1. doge
    • 1833, Julie de Quérangal, Philippe de Morvelle, Revue des Deux Mondes, T.2,4
      Non pas, non pas, cria-t-on de tous côtés ; il y a encore Venise. - Venise la reine des mers ! - Le lion de Saint-Marc ! - Le Bucentaure ! - Le doge ! - Quel homme qu'un doge ! []

ReferencesEdit

  • Dictionnaire de l’Académie française, huitième édition, 1932-1935

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Venetian Doxe, from Latin ducem, accusative of dux (leader, prince). See also the doublets duce and duca.

NounEdit

doge m (plural dogi)

  1. doge

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LithuanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (dogè) IPA(key): [doˈɡʲɛ]
  • (dòge) IPA(key): [ˈdoɡʲɛ]

NounEdit

dogè m

  1. locative singular form of dogas.

NounEdit

dòge m

  1. vocative singular form of dogas.

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

doge m (plural doges)

  1. (historical) doge (chief magistrate in the republics of Venice and Genoa)

VolapükEdit

NounEdit

doge

  1. dative singular of dog