See also: every one

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English everichon, equivalent to every +‎ one.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

everyone

  1. Every person.
    • 1847 Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter XVII
      It was well I secured this forage [] ; everyone downstairs was too much engaged to think of us.
    • 1914, James Joyce, Dubliners, "An Encounter"
      Everyone's heart palpitated as Leo Dillon handed up the paper and everyone assumed an innocent face.

Usage notesEdit

  • This can be used loosely to mean "the majority of people," though linguistic purists will protest. Everyone takes a singular verb: Is everyone here?; Everyone has heard of it. However, similar to what occurs with collective or group nouns like crowd or team, sometimes a plural pronoun refers back to everyone: Everyone was laughing at first, but then they all stopped.

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