See also: Eddy

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English eddy, from Old English edēa, from ed- (turning, back, reverse) + ēa (water), equivalent to ed- +‎ ea.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈɛd.i/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛdi

NounEdit

eddy (plural eddies)

  1. A current of air or water running back, or in an opposite direction to the main current.
    • 1922, A. M. Chisholm, A Thousand a Plate:
      In the bow old Dobbs fought the stream cunningly, twisting the nose into eddies and backwaters, taking advantage when he could of set of current, and when he could not, paddling doggedly, not so powerfully, perhaps, as his partner, but with equal steadiness.
  2. A circular current; a whirlpool.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

eddy (third-person singular simple present eddies, present participle eddying, simple past and past participle eddied)

  1. (intransitive) To form an eddy; to move in, or as if in, an eddy; to move in a circle.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “eddy”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

AnagramsEdit


LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French adieu.

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

eddy

  1. Nonstandard spelling of äddi.

WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

eddy

  1. Obsolete form of addawa ((s/he) promises).