See also: fátum

Latin edit

Etymology edit

From fātus, perfect active participle of for (speak).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fātum n (genitive fātī); second declension

  1. destiny, fate, lot
    Synonyms: fortūna, sors, necessitās
    alicuius fatum est/ alicui fatum est + infinitivesomeone is fated to ...
    • 29 BCE – 19 BCE, Virgil, Aeneid 1.1-3:
      Arma virumque canō, Trōiae quī prīmus ab ōrīs
      Ītaliam, fātō profugus, Lāvīniaque vēnit
      lītora, [...].
      I sing of arms and a man, exiled by fate, who first came from the coasts of Troy to Italy and the shores of Lavinium.
      (Here, “by fate” [fātō] is an ablative of cause, meaning “because of,” or “on account of.” The epic of Aeneas and his band of refugees begins: divine fate compels their actions and will propel the story. See: Aeneid, Troy, Italy, Lavinium.)
  2. (in the plural) death
    Synonyms: mors, fūnus, exitus, perniciēs, interitus, somnus, fīnis, sopor
  3. (of a god) speech
  4. utterance, declaration, proclamation, prediction, prophecy
    Synonyms: praedictiō, praedictum, prophētīa
    • 43 BCEc. 17 CE, Ovid, Fasti 1.481-482:
      sīc erat in fātīs; nec tē tua culpa fugāvit, sed deus
      Thus it was in the prophecies: no fault of yours has exiled you, but a god.

Declension edit

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative fātum fāta
Genitive fātī fātōrum
Dative fātō fātīs
Accusative fātum fāta
Ablative fātō fātīs
Vocative fātum fāta

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

See also edit

Participle edit

fātum

  1. inflection of fātus:
    1. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter singular
    2. accusative masculine singular

References edit

  • fatum”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • fatum in Enrico Olivetti, editor (2003-2024) Dizionario Latino, Olivetti Media Communication
  • fatum”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • fatum”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin fātum. Doublet of bajać, bajan, fabuła, fama, fatalny, and fejm.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfa.tum/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -atum
  • Syllabification: fa‧tum

Noun edit

fatum n

  1. destiny, fate, doom, jinx

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • fatum in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • fatum in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from Latin fatum.

Noun edit

fatum n (uncountable)

  1. fate

Declension edit

Serbo-Croatian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin fatum.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /fǎːtum/
  • Hyphenation: fa‧tum

Noun edit

fátum m (Cyrillic spelling фа́тум)

  1. fate, destiny

Declension edit

References edit

  • fatum” in Hrvatski jezični portal

West Makian edit

Etymology edit

May be the same as West Makian fatung (to sniff).

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

fatum

  1. (transitive) to smell (something)

Conjugation edit

Conjugation of fatum (action verb)
singular plural
inclusive exclusive
1st person tafatum mafatum afatum
2nd person nafatum fafatum
3rd person inanimate ifatum dafatum
animate
imperative nafatum, fatum fafatum, fatum

References edit

  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours[1], Pacific linguistics