GalicianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Circa 1300. Probably from Proto-Germanic *fatą:[1] compare Old High German faz (container; vessel), Old Norse fat (vessel; cover; blanket; garment), English fat (container; vessel; vat).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fato m (plural fatos)

  1. herd, flock, group
    Os desa vila non son máis que un fato de borrachos!
    That town's people are but a group of drunkards!
    • 1300, R. Martínez López (ed.), General Estoria. Versión gallega del siglo XIV. Oviedo: Publicacións de Archivum, page 134:
      Jupiter se fezo caudillo da grey -et grey se entende aqui por ovellas ou grey de fato dellas, et caudillo por carneyro
      Jupiter became leader of the flock - and flock here means sheep or flock of group of them, and leader means ram
Derived termsEdit
  • afatar (to harness, rig; to gather, put togther)
  • fatelo (piece of clothing)

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin fatuus (foolish).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fato m (feminine singular fata, masculine plural fatos, feminine plural fatas)

  1. foolish, fatuous
  2. annoying

ReferencesEdit

  • fato” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2018.
  • fato” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • fato” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • fato” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English fateItalian fato, and further borrowed from French fatalGerman fatalRussian фата́льный (fatálʹnyj)Spanish fatal.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfato/
  • Rhymes: -ato
  • Hyphenation: fa‧to

NounEdit

fato (plural fati)

  1. fate, lot

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


IstriotEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin factus.

AdjectiveEdit

fato

  1. done, made

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfa.to/
  • Rhymes: -ato
  • Hyphenation: fà‧to

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin fātum.

NounEdit

fato m (plural fati)

  1. fate, destiny
Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • fato in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

fato

  1. first-person singular present indicative of fatare

LatinEdit

NounEdit

fātō

  1. dative/ablative neuter singular of fatum

ParticipleEdit

fātō

  1. dative/ablative masculine/neuter singular of fātus

MirandeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin factum.

NounEdit

fato m (plural fatos)

  1. fact (sometimes which is real)

Derived termsEdit


PortugueseEdit

 
fatos

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfa.tu/, [ˈfa.tu]

  • IPA(key): (Brazil) [ˈfä.t̪ʊ]
  • Rhymes: -atu
  • Hyphenation: fa‧to

Etymology 1Edit

Uncertain, but likely from a Proto-Germanic root *fat-; compare Old High German fazzōn (to get dressed), German Fetzen (rag(s), scrap(s)), Old Norse fat (vessel; cover; blanket; garment), English fat (liquid container, vessel; vat). Possibly from a supposed Gothic *𐍆𐌰𐍄 (*fat).[1] Compare Franco-Provençal fata (pocket), Galician fato (herd), Spanish hato (bundle; animal herd; worker supplies; clique, gang).

NounEdit

fato m (plural fatos)

  1. a set of clothing traditionally worn together, such as a uniform or national costume
    Synonym: traje
  2. (Portugal) suit (formal clothing, male or female)
    Synonym: (Brazil) terno
  3. (Portugal) entrails (internal organs of an animal, especially the intestines)
    Synonym: entranhas

QuotationsEdit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:fato.

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Alteration of facto. From Latin factum. Doublet of feito.

NounEdit

fato m (plural fatos)

  1. Brazilian Portuguese standard spelling of facto.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Unknown, but likely ultimately from Arabic [Term?].

NounEdit

fato m (plural fatos)

  1. (collective) a small herd of goats; a flock

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ * Coromines, Joan; Pascual, José A. (1984), “hato”, in Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico (in Spanish), volume G-Ma, Madrid: Gredos, →ISBN, page 326-328

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fato f

  1. vocative singular of fată

SpanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fato (feminine fata, masculine plural fatos, feminine plural fatas)

  1. Alternative spelling of fatuo

Further readingEdit


TernateEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fato

  1. (transitive) to align, put in a row, put side by side
  2. (transitive) to order, arrange

ConjugationEdit

Conjugation of fato
Singular Plural
Inclusive Exclusive
1st tofato fofato mifato
2nd nofato nifato
3rd Human m ofato ifato, yofato
Human f mofato
Non-human ifato
* m - masculine, f - feminine, - archaic

ReferencesEdit

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh