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EnglishEdit

 
Photo of focaccia bread with rosemary garnish.

EtymologyEdit

Diminutive form of Italian fuoco (fire), from Latin focus (fireplace), or through a Late Latin or Vulgar Latin *focacia. Cognate with Serbo-Croatian pogača (unleavened bread).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

focaccia (countable and uncountable, plural focaccias)

  1. (uncountable) A flat bread similar in style, composition, and texture to modern pizza doughs and topped with herbs, cheese and other products. Focaccia typically consists of high-gluten flour, oil, water, sugar, salt and yeast.
    • 2001, Eve Zibart, The Ethnic Food Lover's Companion, page 47
      The same dough can be used for bread, rolls, breadsticks, bruschetta, focaccia, calzone, or pizza. The only practical difference between pizza and focaccia is the thickness of the crust: Traditional pizza crust is thin, and something an inch or two thick [] is more like focaccia.
  2. (countable) A sandwich made with this type of bread.

See alsoEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin, Vulgar Latin *focācia, from the feminine form of focācius (of the hearth, baked on a fire) (compare Spanish hogaza, Portuguese fogaça, Catalan fogassa, Occitan fogaça, fogassa, French fougasse, fouace, Ligurian fugassa), from Latin focus (hearth, fireplace). Cognate with Serbo-Croatian pogača (unleavened bread). Doublet of hogaza.

NounEdit

focaccia f (plural focacce)

  1. A focaccia.
  2. A type of cake.

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian focaccia. Doublet of hogaza.

NounEdit

focaccia f (plural focaccias)

  1. focaccia