See also: Sandwich and sándwich

English edit

 
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An Italian sandwich.
 
a composite material sandwich with a honeycomb core

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Named after its supposed inventor, the Earl of Sandwich (see Sandwich).

Pronunciation edit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈsæn(d)wɪd͡ʒ/, /ˈsæn(d)wɪt͡ʃ/, [ˈsæmwɪd͡ʒ], [ˈsæ̃wɪd͡ʒ]
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈsænˌ(d)wɪt͡ʃ/, [ˈsæmˌwɪt͡ʃ], [ˈsæmˌɪt͡ʃ], [ˈsæ̃ˌwɪt͡ʃ]
    • (Maryland) IPA(key): /ˈsæn(d)wɪd͡ʒ/
  • (Canada) IPA(key): /ˈsænˌ(d)wɪt͡ʃ/
  • (file)
  • Homophone: SDCH

Noun edit

sandwich (plural sandwiches or (rare) sandwichs)

  1. A dish or foodstuff where at least one piece, but typically two or more pieces, of bread serve(s) as the wrapper or container of some other food.
    • 2002, Serena Carrington, Avalon, Writers Club Press, page 92:
      He laid out a linen tablecloth and a few sandwichs from some bread, dressing, and beef.
    • 2012, Allie McNeil, Watergate Summer, AuthorHouse, page 160:
      And the only "care" I could offer was egg sandwichs and Lilly's unfaltering attention.
    • 2020 January 21, Brontë Aurell, The Little Book of Scandi Living, White Lion Publishing, →ISBN, page 51:
      The most famous place in Copenhagen, Ida Davidsen, has a menu of 190 different kinds of open sandwich.
  2. (by extension) Any combination formed by layering one type of material between two layers of some other material.
  3. (UK) A layer cake or sandwich cake.
    • 2016, Alysa Levene, Cake: A Slice of History:
      [] our local agricultural fair in Warwickshire even has a category for Victoria sandwiches baked by male bakers.
  4. (archaic) A sandwichman (one who wears a sandwich board).
    • Pall Mall Gazette, quoted in 2004, Chris Jenks, Urban Culture, page 129:
      We have, and not so very long ago, seen women employed as 'sandwiches'.

Usage notes edit

  • In Ireland and the UK, sandwich often presupposes sliced bread, in which case similar foods made with other types of bread are called "filled roll", "filled bap", etc.[1]

Synonyms edit

Hyponyms edit

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

References edit

  1. ^ Lynne Murphy (28 May 2014) "sandwiches, more particularly bacon sandwiches" Separated by a Common Language

Verb edit

sandwich (third-person singular simple present sandwiches, present participle sandwiching, simple past and past participle sandwiched)

  1. (transitive) To place (an item) physically between two other, usually flat, items.
    • 1951 January, R. A. H. Weight, “A Railway Recorder in Essex and Hertfordshire”, in Railway Magazine, page 46:
      We saw a few Gresley Moguls on goods, as a limited amount of freight traffic was sandwiched in even on this busy day.
    • 1959 May, William Jones, John Hodge, “Resorts for Railfans - 28: Cardiff, Part Two”, in Trains Illustrated, page 265:
      An oddity of the auto-train services, incidentally, was the occasional "doubling", usually for football excursions, when the load was increased to four coaches with the engine sandwiched between.
    • 2021 June 14, Scott Mullen, “Scotland 0-2 Czech Republic”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      But as the game looked destined for a stalemate at half-time, the hammer blow arrived. A corner was just about cleared, only for the Scots to switch off.
      Vladimir Coufal overlapped with space and time on his side, his delivery being met by Schick, who steered his header home while sandwiched between Liam Cooper and Grant Hanley.
    • 2022 November 2, Paul Bigland, “New trains, old trains, and splendid scenery”, in RAIL, number 969, page 57:
      One can't escape the huge nuclear facility at Sellafield (supplier of much of the line's remaining freight traffic), or miss the wild shingle beaches with exposed and precarious bungalows sandwiched between the railway and the shore at Braystones.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To put or set between two other events in time.
    • 1988, Cynthia Solomon, Computer Environments for Children, page 94:
      Street BASIC is becoming the language taught in junior high; it is sandwiched between Logo, which is taught in elementary school, and Pascal, which is taught in high school.
    • 2011 April 11, Phil McNulty, “Liverpool 3 - 0 Man City”, in BBC Sport[2]:
      Dirk Kuyt sandwiched a goal in between Carroll's double as City endured a night of total misery, with captain Carlos Tevez limping off early on with a hamstring strain that puts a serious question mark over his participation in Saturday's FA Cup semi-final against Manchester United at Wembley.
  3. (transitive, sex) To double penetrate.
    • 2017, Madhuri Pavamani, Juma:
      They sandwiched her, the footballer at her back, his dick tucked into the perfect seam of her ass as he fingered her pussy while the shorter, leaner, covered-in-tattoos Monsieur Artiste kissed her and pinched her nipples
  4. (transitive, informal) To feed sandwiches to.
    • 1866, Emma Jane Worboise, “The St. Beetha’s Temperance Society”, in St. Beetha’s; or, The Heiress of Arne, London: “Christian World” Office, []; Jackson, Walford, and Hodder, [], →OCLC, page 213:
      But one or two evil-disposed characters muttered they might be sure the lady had her own turn to serve, and they might be sure they wasn't "teaed and muffined and sandwiched for nothing!"
    • 1897 January 7, “City’s Veteran Firemen. New Year Reception. The Rooms of the Association Filled with Guests. Reminiscences, Reunion, and Refreshments,”, in The Pittsfield Sun, volume 97, number 26, Pittsfield, Mass., page 7:
      The association of veteran firemen, which has a membership of 200, kept open house for New Year callers, and all comers were bountifully sandwiched and coffeed.
    • 1917 November 11, Dumas Malone, “The Ring and the Red Triangle: How the Men Who Wear the New Insignia Go With the Army”, in The Macon Daily Telegraph, Macon, Ga., first section, article section “The Ever-Ready Hut”, page four:
      Here at Camp Wheeler we “coffeed” and “sandwiched” the drafted men when they came from Camp Gordon several weeks ago, and the men from Camp Pike more recently.
    • 1929, Howard W[allace] Peak, A Ranger of Commerce or 52 Years on the Road, page 87:
      There we were met by enterprising citizens and coffeed and sandwiched by pretty girls.
    • 1942 August 31, “Who Clipped the Soldiers’—Hair?”, in Harrisburg Telegraph, volume CXII, number 206, Harrisburg, Pa., second section, page 9:
      Five soldiers had been sandwiched and coffeed at the Elks canteen, were a little short of money, needed haircuts.
    • 1953, [Irene Curzon, 2nd] Baroness Ravensdale, In Many Rhythms: An Autobiography, page 249:
      I clothed desperate families, and sandwiched and teaed many distracted souls.
    • 1959 October 7, Charles House, “Charlie Pauses at 75-Mile Mark To Recount Latest Adventures”, in Appleton Post-Crescent, volume LI, number 88, Appleton-Neenah-Menasha, Wis., section “Coffee Break”, page A16:
      I write this on the kitchen table at the home of the kind Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Ebert, who sandwiched and coffee’d me.
    • 1964 October 13, Gene Cowles, Valley Times, volume 27, number 246, San Fernando Valley, Calif., page 15:
      Mrs. Robert (Helen) Adickes, of Flintridge, mate of the chairman of the Pilots For Goldwater committee, was in there pitching as usual seeing that everyone was fed and coffeed or, in the case of the young colts and fillies, sandwiched and popped.
    • 1975 October 14, Kathleen Merryman, “Freedom Train fires up parties”, in The Billings Gazette, 90th year, number 165, Billings, Mont., page 11-A:
      Hostesses like Laurie McCormack, who’s used to keeping politicians, press and businessmen coffeed and sandwiched on special visits to the train, sat back and let Jay Montague and other merchants reverse roles.
    • 1976 August 28, Joan Flanagan, “cassidy’s mob”, in The Sydney Morning Herald, number 43,275, page 14:
      “In the daytimes, he fixes things for people,” I said, “and in return they keep him sandwiched and coffeed.”
  5. (intransitive, rare) To eat sandwiches.
    • 1935 June 29, Ellen Snebley, “Teapot Tattle”, in Santa Ana Journal, volume 1, number 52, Santa Ana, Calif., page eight:
      Mr. and Mrs. Ted Craig (he[sic] speaker of the assembly) emerging from a popular drive-in after having sandwiched and coffeed . . .
    • 1965, Thea Astley, The Slow Natives, page 196:
      He coffeed and sandwiched along the highway.
    • 2006, Gary Zingher, “The Child as Everyday Explorer”, in Theme Play: Exciting Young Imaginations, Libraries Unlimited, →ISBN, page 95:
      The Red Knight and his squire might be sandwiching at the very next table.

Translations edit

Adjective edit

sandwich (not comparable)

  1. (US) Of a meal or serving size that is smaller than a dinner. (Can we add an example for this sense?)

Usage notes edit

  • The adjective sense is used primarily by restaurants specializing in barbecue, and does not imply that the meal includes an actual sandwich.

Danish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English sandwich.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /sanvitsj/, [ˈsanˌʋid̥ɕ], [ˈsanˌwid̥ɕ], [ˈsanˌʋid̥s]

Noun edit

sandwich c (singular definite sandwichen, plural indefinite sandwich or sandwicher)

  1. sandwich

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

References edit

Dutch edit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English sandwich, after the Earl of Sandwich.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɛnd.ʋɪtʃ/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: sand‧wich

Noun edit

sandwich m (plural sandwiches, diminutive sandwichje n)

  1. sandwich

Usage notes edit

  • A sandwich is more commonly called a boterham (which may also denote a single slice of bread) or a broodje (which may also denote a bun or roll) in Dutch.

Derived terms edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English sandwich.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

sandwich m (plural sandwichs or sandwiches)

  1. sandwich (food)
    Hyponyms: jambon beurre, panini, tacos français

Usage notes edit

  • French does not follow the English rule of adding es to nouns ending in the sound /tʃ/. Since the final /s/ is not pronounced in the plural, there is no difficulty in pronouncing the plural formed by adding s rather than es.

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Italian edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English sandwich.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

sandwich m (invariable)

  1. sandwich

Derived terms edit

Norwegian Bokmål edit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology edit

From English sandwich.

Noun edit

sandwich m (definite singular sandwichen, indefinite plural sandwicher, definite plural sandwichene)

  1. a sandwich

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology edit

From English sandwich, supposedly named for its inventor, the Earl of Sandwich.

Noun edit

sandwich m (definite singular sandwichen, indefinite plural sandwichar, definite plural sandwichane)

  1. a sandwich

References edit

Occitan edit

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

sandwich m (plural sandwiches) (Languedoc)

  1. sandwich
    Synonyms: entrelesca, entrepan

Derived terms edit

See also edit

Further reading edit

Diccionari General de la Lenga Occitana, L’Academia occitana – Consistòri del Gai Saber, 2008-2024, page 622.

Spanish edit

Noun edit

sandwich m (plural sandwiches)

  1. Misspelling of sándwich.