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See also: Sandwich and sándwich

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
An Italian sandwich.
 
a composite material sandwich with a honeycomb core

EtymologyEdit

Named after its supposed inventor, the Earl of Sandwich (see Sandwich).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈsæn(d)wɪd͡ʒ/, /ˈsæn(d)wɪt͡ʃ/, /ˈsæmwɪd͡ʒ/, /ˈsæ̃wɪd͡ʒ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈsænˌ(d)wɪt͡ʃ/, /ˈsæmˌwɪt͡ʃ/, /ˈsæmˌɪt͡ʃ/, /ˈsæ̃ˌwɪt͡ʃ/
  • (file)
  • Homophone: SDCH

NounEdit

sandwich (plural sandwiches or sandwichs)

  1. A dish or foodstuff where two or more slices of bread serve as the wrapper or container of some other food.
    • 2002, Serena Carrington, Avalon, Writers Club Press, p.92:
      He laid out a linen tablecloth and a few sandwichs from some bread, dressing, and beef.
    • 2012, Allie McNeil, Watergate Summer, AuthorHouse, p.160:
      And the only "care" I could offer was egg sandwichs and Lilly's unfaltering attention.
  2. (by extension) Any combination formed by layering one type of material between two layers of some other material.
  3. (Britain) A layer cake or sandwich cake.
    • 2016, Alysa Levene, Cake: A Slice of History
      [] our local agricultural fair in Warwickshire even has a category for Victoria sandwiches baked by male bakers.

SynonymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

sandwich (third-person singular simple present sandwiches, present participle sandwiching, simple past and past participle sandwiched)

  1. To place one item between two other, usually flat, items
  2. (figuratively) To put or set something between two others, in time.
    • 2011 April 11, Phil McNulty, “Liverpool 3 - 0 Man City”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      Dirk Kuyt sandwiched a goal in between Carroll's double as City endured a night of total misery, with captain Carlos Tevez limping off early on with a hamstring strain that puts a serious question mark over his participation in Saturday's FA Cup semi-final against Manchester United at Wembley.

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sandwich (not comparable)

  1. (US) Of a meal or serving size that is smaller than a dinner.

Usage notesEdit

  • The adjective sense is used primarily by restaurants specializing in barbecue, and does not imply that the meal includes an actual sandwich.

DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English sandwich.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: sand‧wich

NounEdit

sandwich m (plural sandwiches, diminutive sandwichje n)

  1. sandwich

Usage notesEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English sandwich.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sɑ̃.dwiʃ/, /sɑ̃.dwitʃ/
  • (file)

NounEdit

sandwich m (plural sandwichs)

  1. sandwich (snack)

Usage notesEdit

  • Note that French does not follow the English rule of adding es to nouns ending in the sound /tʃ/. Since the final /s/ is not pronounced in the plural, there is no difficulty in pronouncing the plural formed by adding s rather than es.

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English sandwich.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sandwich m (invariable)

  1. sandwich

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsanɡwit͡ʃ/, [ˈsãŋɡwit͡ʃ]

NounEdit

sandwich m (plural sandwichs)

  1. sandwich