Last modified on 22 April 2015, at 11:21

fides

See also: Fides

LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Indo-European *bʰidʰ-, zero-grade of Proto-Indo-European *bʰeydʰ- (to command, to persuade, to trust). Cognate to Latin fīdō (I trust) and Proto-Germanic *bīdaną.

NounEdit

fidēs f (genitive fideī); fifth declension

  1. faith, belief
  2. reliance
  3. confidence, trust
InflectionEdit

Fifth declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative fidēs fidēs
genitive fideī fidērum
dative fideī fidēbus
accusative fidem fidēs
ablative fidē fidēbus
vocative fidēs fidēs
Related termsEdit
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Ancient Greek σφίδη (sphídē).

NounEdit

fidēs f (genitive fidis); third declension

  1. chord
  2. the gut-string of a musical instrument
  3. (in the plural) lyre, lute, harp (by extension)

Usage notesEdit

Usually encountered in the plural.

DeclensionEdit

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative fidēs fidēs
genitive fidis fidum
dative fidī fidibus
accusative fidem fidēs
ablative fide fidibus
vocative fidēs fidēs

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Inflection of fīdō (I trust).

VerbEdit

fīdēs

  1. second-person singular future active indicative of fīdō

ReferencesEdit

  • fides1” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
  • fides2” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.

VolapükEdit

NounEdit

fides

  1. dative plural of fid