fortnight

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English fourtenight, fourten night, from Old English fēowertīene niht (fourteen days), equivalent to fourteen +‎ night. Compare sennight.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fortnight (plural fortnights)

  1. (chiefly UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, dated elsewhere) A period of 2 weeks.
    • 1933 January 9, George Orwell [pseudonym; Eric Arthur Blair], chapter 1, in Down and Out in Paris and London, London: Victor Gollancz [], OCLC 2603818:
      On being kicked the girl fell desperately in love with Henri, and for a fortnight they lived together and spent a thousand francs of Henri's money.
    • 1969 January 12, Benjamin Welles, “A Hot Potato for Nixon”, in The New York Times[1], ISSN 0362-4331:
      The “lame duck” Johnson Administration, in its final fortnight in office, grappled last week with a diplomatic hot potato in the form of the latest Soviet proposal for a “just and lasting” Middle East peace settlement.

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