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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin frūstrātus, perfect passive participle of frūstrō (I deceive).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

frustrate (third-person singular simple present frustrates, present participle frustrating, simple past and past participle frustrated)

  1. (transitive) To disappoint or defeat; to vex by depriving of something expected or desired.
    It frustrates me to do all this work and then lose it all.
  2. (transitive) To hinder or thwart.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:hinder
    My clumsy fingers frustrate my typing efforts.
    • 2019 October 9, Farhad Manjoo, “Dealing With China Isn’t Worth the Moral Cost”, in New York Times[1]:
      With its far larger population, China’s economy will inevitably come to eclipse ours, but that is hardly a mortal threat. In climate change, the world faces a huge collective-action problem that will require global cooperation. According to this view, treating China like an adversary will only frustrate our own long-term goals.
  3. (transitive) To cause stress or annoyance.
    This test frustrates me because if I fail, it'll destroy my grade.

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

frustrate (comparative more frustrate, superlative most frustrate)

  1. Vain; ineffectual; useless; nugatory.
    • Shakespeare
      Our frustrate search.

QuotationsEdit

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LatinEdit