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HungarianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

An onomatopoeia.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈɡaː]
  • (file)

InterjectionEdit

  1. honk (representation of the sound of a goose)
    • 1954, Lőrinc Szabó, Falusi hangverseny (Village concert)[1]:
      ! ! ! / Szalad világgá / Liba mama, ha a Csacsi / rábőg, hogy I-á!
      Honk! Honk! Honk! / Running far away / mama Goose, when the Donkey / brays at her Hee-haw!

IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse , from Proto-Germanic *ganhāną.

VerbEdit

(weak verb, third-person singular past indicative gáði, supine gáð)

  1. (intransitive) to look, to see, to check
ConjugationEdit

This entry needs an inflection-table template.

NounEdit

 f (genitive singular gár, no plural)

  1. care, caution
    Synonyms: aðgát, varúð
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Of onomatopoeic origin.

NounEdit

 f (genitive singular gár, no plural)

  1. bark, barking
    Synonyms: gjamm, gelt
DeclensionEdit

IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Irish gád (danger, need).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 m (genitive singular )

  1. need, requirement
    dhuit imeacht.
    You don’t need to go; you don’t have to go.

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
ghá ngá
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ “gáḃaḋ” in Foclóir Gaeḋilge agus Béarla, Irish Texts Society, 2nd ed., 1927, by Patrick S. Dinneen.

Further readingEdit


MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

(Zhuyin ㄍㄚˊ)

  1. Pinyin transcription of
  2. Pinyin transcription of
  3. Pinyin transcription of ,
  4. Pinyin transcription of
  5. Pinyin transcription of
  6. Pinyin transcription of

Old NorseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From geyja (to bark).

NounEdit

 f

  1. barking
DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • in A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, G. T. Zoëga, Clarendon Press, 1910, at Internet Archive.

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *ganhāną

NounEdit

 f

  1. attention
Usage notesEdit

Often in compounds, such as úgá or gáleysi

VerbEdit

(singular past indicative gáði, plural past indicative gáðu, past participle gát)

  1. to heed
    (with infinitive) (about verbs)
    (with genitive) (about nouns)
      • guðs hann gáði
        he gave heed to God
      • sín
        to take care of oneself
      • glýja þú né gáðir
        thou hadst no mind for joy
ConjugationEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Icelandic:
  • Norwegian Nynorsk:

ReferencesEdit