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See also: Honk and hönk

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Onomatopoeic.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

honk (third-person singular simple present honks, present participle honking, simple past and past participle honked)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To use a car horn.
    They stood and observed how long it took for the other cars to honk.
  2. (intransitive) To make a loud, harsh sound like a car horn.
  3. (intransitive) To make the vocal sound of a goose.
  4. (informal) To vomit: regurgitate the contents of one's stomach.
  5. (informal) To have a bad smell.
  6. (informal) To squeeze playfully, usually a breast or nose.
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

honk (countable and uncountable, plural honks)

  1. The sound produced by a typical car horn.
  2. The cry of a goose.
  3. (informal) A bad smell.
TranslationsEdit

InterjectionEdit

honk

  1. Imitation of car horn, used, for example, to clear a path for oneself.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

honk (plural honks)

  1. Clipping of honky.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch honc, likely through Old Dutch from Proto-Germanic *hank-, *hunk-. Only has cognates in the Frisian languages. Possibly related to haak (hook) and hoek (corner).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

honk n (plural honken, diminutive honkje n)

  1. (somewhat rare) home, place where one belongs, shelter
  2. (games) base (safe zone)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit