See also: Honk and hönk

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Onomatopoeic.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

honk (third-person singular simple present honks, present participle honking, simple past and past participle honked)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To use a car horn.
    They stood and observed how long it took for the other cars to honk.
  2. (intransitive) To make a loud, harsh sound like a car horn.
  3. (intransitive) To make the vocal sound of a goose.
  4. (slang) To vomit: regurgitate the contents of one's stomach.
  5. (slang) To have a bad smell.
  6. (informal) To squeeze playfully, usually a breast or nose.
    She honked my titties.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

honk (countable and uncountable, plural honks)

  1. The sound produced by a typical car horn.
    • 1961 July, J. Geoffrey Todd, “Impressions of railroading in the United States:Part Two”, in Trains Illustrated, page 424:
      The operator went out on to the platform with his handlamp and waved it in the traditional "wash-out" signal across the body. The engineer had been expecting this and responded at once with an acknowledging honk on the horn before bringing this huge, 16-car train gently to a stand at the platform.
  2. The cry of a goose.
  3. (informal) A bad smell.
TranslationsEdit

InterjectionEdit

honk

  1. Imitation of car horn, used, for example, to clear a path for oneself.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

honk (plural honks)

  1. Clipping of honky.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch honc, likely through Old Dutch from Proto-Germanic *hank-, *hunk-. Only has cognates in the Frisian languages and possibly in the Old High German placename Hancwin. Since cognates outside of Germanic are lacking, the word is probably of substrate origin.[1] Possibly related to haak (hook) and hoek (corner).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

honk n (plural honken, diminutive honkje n)

  1. (somewhat rare) home, place where one belongs, shelter
  2. (games) base (safe zone, e.g. in baseball and similar sports)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Papiamentu: honk (dated)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ van der Sijs, Nicoline, editor (2010), “honk”, in Etymologiebank, Meertens Institute