GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German gaffen (to gape; to stare), from Old High German *gaffōn, from Proto-Germanic *gapōną (to gaze, observe), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰeh₁y- (to gape, be wide open)[1]; influenced by and partly merged with Middle High German kaffen, a variant of kapfen (to look, look surprised, gawk, wonder), from Old High German kapfēn (to look, stare, gawk, gape), from Proto-West Germanic *kapēn. Cognate with Dutch gapen, English gape; and also to English cape, keep.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡafɱ̩/, /ˈɡafən/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -afn̩

VerbEdit

gaffen (third-person singular simple present gafft, past tense gaffte, past participle gegafft, auxiliary haben)

  1. to stare at curiously, rubberneck

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ gap” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.