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See also: Sie, šie, się, and si'e

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English sien, from Old English sīgan (to sink, descend), from Proto-Germanic *sīganą, *sīhwaną (to strain, drop), from Proto-Indo-European *seyk- (to pour, strain). Cognate with Dutch zijgen (to filter), German seihen (to strain, sieve), Icelandic síga (to lower).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

sie (third-person singular simple present sies, present participle sying, simple past and past participle sied)

  1. (intransitive) To sink; fall; drop.
  2. (intransitive) To fall, as in a swoon; faint.
  3. (intransitive, dialectal) To drop, as water; trickle.
  4. (transitive) To sift.
  5. (transitive, dialectal) To strain, as milk; filter.

NounEdit

sie (plural sies)

  1. A drop.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

sie (third person singular, gender-neutral, nominative case, accusative sir, possessive adjective hir, possessive noun hirs, reflexive hirself)

  1. (neologism) Gender-neutral (or multigendered) subject pronoun, grammatically equivalent to the gendered pronouns he and she, or singular they
    • 1993 September 24, Alex Martelli, "punishment vs ethics (was Re: Discipline my daughters)", in alt.sex.bondage, Usenet:
      If the child is about the intellectual equal of the parent, sie will eventually start holding hir own in discussions, []
    • 2010 September 16, Jessica Freely, Amaranth and Ash[1], La Vergne: Lightning Source, ISBN 9781461136620, page 101:
      "You must be Ash," sie said, hir voice a shade deeper than Amaranth's.
    • 2011 May 19, Ken Wickham, The Other Genders: Androgyne, Genderqueer, Non-Binary Gender Variant[2], CreateSpace, ISBN 9781461136620, page 7:
      Sie may feel that hir actual identity of hir gender is supposed to be both/neither male or female, outside of gender, third gender, beyond gender, absence of gender, mixing gender, changing gender, or all genders.
    • 2011 August 16, Petra Kuppers, Disability Culture and Community Performance: Find a Strange and Twisted Shape[3], New York: Palgrave Macmillan, ISBN 9780230298279, LCCN 2011012058, LCC PN1590.H36 K87 2011, page 18:
      When I asked hir about hir preferred self-identification in this scene, sie offered me this language, 'sie sharply performs the hotness of teasing all the audience from the edge-space of androgyny.'
SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


ChibchaEdit

NounEdit

sie

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • Comparative Chibchan Phonology (1981)

FinnishEdit

PronounEdit

sie (stem siu-)

  1. (personal, dialectal, including Kven) you (singular; in archaic English: thou).

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (colloquially in unstressed position) IPA(key): /zə/

Etymology 1Edit

From Old High German siu; cognate with Gothic 𐍃𐌹 (si) and Old English sēo (that one (f.)).

PronounEdit

sie f

  1. she
    Ist sie noch krank?
    Is she still sick?
    Das ist meine Katze. Sie heißt Lili.
    This is my cat. Her name is Lili.
  2. it (when the object/article/thing/animal etc., referred to, is feminine (die))
    Scheint die Sonne noch? Nein, sie ist schon runtergegangen.
    Is the sun still out? No, it set already.
InflectionEdit

1Often capitalized, especially in letters

  • The genitive case ihrer is more and more rarely used in modern German.
  • While the genitive of personal pronouns does express ownership, it must not be confused with possessive pronouns. While possessive pronouns such as ihr are put in front of the noun they relate to and follow the inflection rules of adjectives, the genitive form of personal pronouns has only one form, which is not further inflected. Additionally, personal pronouns in the genitive can be put after the word they relate to.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old High German sie (masculine plural), sio (feminine plural), siu (neuter plural).

PronounEdit

sie pl

  1. they; them
InflectionEdit

1Often capitalized, especially in letters

Usage notesEdit

  • In the colloquial speech of some areas, this pronoun is used only enclitically after a verb, as an ending /zə/. E.g. hamse, könnse. Stressed instances are replaced with the demonstrative pronoun die. This reflects a similar development for es/das.
  • While the genitive of personal pronouns does express ownership, it must not be confused with possessive pronouns. While possessive pronouns such as ihr are put in front of the noun they relate to and follow the inflection rules of adjectives, the genitive form of a personal pronoun has only one form, which is not further inflected. Additionally, personal pronouns in the genitive can be put after the word they relate to.

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • sie in Duden online

HunsrikEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • sii (Portuguese based orthography)

Etymology 1Edit

From Old High German siu; cognate with Gothic 𐍃𐌹 (si) and Old English sēo (that one (f.)).

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

sie

  1. she

InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old High German sie (masculine plural), sio (feminine plural), siu (neuter plural).

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

sie

  1. they

InflectionEdit

Further readingEdit


IngrianEdit

NounEdit

sie

  1. binding

KarelianEdit

AdverbEdit

sie

  1. there

PronounEdit

sie

(Stem: si-)

  1. (personal) you (singular)

SynonymsEdit


Middle DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

sie

  1. Alternative form of si (both feminine singular and all plural)

Middle Low GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

sie

  1. Alternative form of .

Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronounEdit

sie m, f

  1. she (accusative)
  2. they

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Low German: se