Open main menu

Wiktionary β

See also: Gammon

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French gambon (compare modern French jambon (ham)), from gambe (leg), from Late Latin *gamba, from Ancient Greek κάμπη (kámpē), from Proto-Indo-European *kamp- (to bend; crooked).

NounEdit

gammon (plural gammons)

  1. The lower or hind part of a side of bacon.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

gammon (third-person singular simple present gammons, present participle gammoning, simple past and past participle gammoned)

  1. To cure bacon by salting.

Etymology 2Edit

Probably a special use of Middle English gamen (game).

NounEdit

gammon (plural gammons)

  1. (backgammon) A victory in backgammon achieved when the opponent has not taken a single stone; (also, rarely, backgammon, the game itself).
Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

gammon (third-person singular simple present gammons, present participle gammoning, simple past and past participle gammoned)

  1. (backgammon) To beat by a gammon (without the opponent taking a stone).

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Perhaps related to the first etymology, with reference to tying up a ham.

NounEdit

gammon (plural gammons)

  1. (nautical) A rope fastening a bowsprit to the stem of a ship (usually called a gammoning).

VerbEdit

gammon (third-person singular simple present gammons, present participle gammoning, simple past and past participle gammoned)

  1. To lash with ropes (on a ship).
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Perhaps a special use of the word from etymology 2.

NounEdit

gammon (plural gammons)

  1. (dated) Chatter, ridiculous nonsense.

VerbEdit

gammon (third-person singular simple present gammons, present participle gammoning, simple past and past participle gammoned)

  1. (colloquial, dated) To deceive, to lie plausibly.
    • 1959, Georgette Heyer, chapter 1, in The Unknown Ajax:
      And no use for anyone to tell Charles that this was because the Family was in mourning for Mr Granville Darracott […]: Charles might only have been second footman at Darracott Place for a couple of months when that disaster occurred, but no one could gammon him into thinking that my lord cared a spangle for his heir.