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See also: Gammon

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French gambon (compare modern French jambon (ham)), from gambe (leg), from Late Latin *gamba, from Ancient Greek κάμπη (kámpē), from Proto-Indo-European *kamp- (to bend; crooked).

NounEdit

gammon (countable and uncountable, plural gammons)

  1. The lower or hind part of a side of bacon.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

gammon (third-person singular simple present gammons, present participle gammoning, simple past and past participle gammoned)

  1. To cure bacon by salting.

Etymology 2Edit

Probably a special use of Middle English gamen (game).

NounEdit

gammon (plural gammons)

  1. (backgammon) A victory in backgammon achieved when the opponent has not taken a single stone; (also, rarely, backgammon, the game itself).
Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

gammon (third-person singular simple present gammons, present participle gammoning, simple past and past participle gammoned)

  1. (backgammon) To beat by a gammon (without the opponent taking a stone).

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Perhaps related to the first etymology, with reference to tying up a ham.

NounEdit

gammon (plural gammons)

  1. (nautical) A rope fastening a bowsprit to the stem of a ship (usually called a gammoning).

VerbEdit

gammon (third-person singular simple present gammons, present participle gammoning, simple past and past participle gammoned)

  1. To lash with ropes (on a ship).
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Perhaps a special use of the word from etymology 2.

NounEdit

gammon (plural gammons)

  1. (dated) Chatter, ridiculous nonsense.

VerbEdit

gammon (third-person singular simple present gammons, present participle gammoning, simple past and past participle gammoned)

  1. (colloquial, dated) To deceive, to lie plausibly.
    • 1959, Georgette Heyer, chapter 1, in The Unknown Ajax:
      And no use for anyone to tell Charles that this was because the Family was in mourning for Mr Granville Darracott […]: Charles might only have been second footman at Darracott Place for a couple of months when that disaster occurred, but no one could gammon him into thinking that my lord cared a spangle for his heir.

Etymology 5Edit

Gained popularity in 2017 (in the phrase "Great Wall of Gammon", likening the referents' rosy complexions to gammon (ham, bacon)), although it was in use earlier (the BBC points to a 2016 use of "gammon face", and some have connected the term to Charles Dickens' description of such a man's "gammon tendency" in Nicholas Nickleby).

NounEdit

gammon (countable and uncountable, plural gammons)

  1. (neologism, pejorative) A middle-aged or older right-wing white man, or such men collectively.

Further readingEdit

  • George Pierpoint (14 May 2018), “Why your social media is covered in gammon”, in BBC News[1], BBC

ReferencesEdit