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See also: bacón, Bacon, and bà con

Contents

EnglishEdit

 Bacon (disambiguation) on Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English bacon (meat from the back and sides of a pig), from Anglo-Norman bacon, bacun (ham, flitch, strip of lard), from Old Low Frankish *bakō (ham, flitch), from Proto-Germanic *bakô, *bakkô (back), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeg- (back, buttocks; to vault, arch). Cognate with Old High German bahho, bacho (back, ham, side of bacon) (compare Alemannic German Bache, Bachen), Old Saxon baco (back), Dutch bake (side of bacon, ham), Old English bæc (back). More at back.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 
Raw belly bacon or streaky bacon, usually referred to simply as bacon in the US
 
Raw back bacon, usually referred to simply as bacon in the UK

bacon (usually uncountable, plural bacons)

  1. Cured meat from the sides, belly, or back of a pig.
    • 2006, Pruess, Joanna, Seduced by Bacon, The Lyons Press, →ISBN, page 93:
      They fried the fish with bacon and were astonished, for no fish had ever seemed so delicious before.
    • 2009 March 31, Casey, Laura, “Piggin' out on bacon at S.F.'s BaconCamp”, in San Jose Mercury News[1], retrieved 2010-10-19:
      For us the pig's the means, while bacon is the end / Providing gustatory heights to which we can ascend.
    • 2009 August 12, Abraham, Lisa, “Bacon comes home - Old favorite tastes even better when you do the curing yourself”, in Akron Beacon Journal, Akron, Ohio, page D1:
      Bacon is something that everybody is familiar with and most people grew up eating. It has a comfort aspect to it and a familiarity. It's also got an addictive aspect to it - that sweet and salty combination of flavors. And it's probably just a little bit unhealthy for you. When you get to have bacon, it's exciting and something you look forward to.
  2. Thin slices of the above in long strips.
  3. (slang, derogatory) The police or spies.
    Run! It's the bacon!
  4. (cycling, slang) Road rash.

Usage notesEdit

In the UK, the word bacon on its own usually refers specifically to loin or back bacon (similar to the US Canadian bacon). In the US, bacon usually refers to side or belly bacon (referred to as streaky bacon in the UK).

SynonymsEdit

  • (Cut of meat from a pig): ham, pork

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

1899, "thin, smoked lard", from English bacon, from Middle English bacon (meat from the back and sides of a pig), from Old French bacon, bacun (ham, strip of lard), from Frankish *bakkō, from Proto-Germanic *bakō, *baką, *bakaz (back), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeg- (back, buttocks; to vault, arch). Cognate with Old High German bahho, bacho (back, ham, side of bacon), Old Saxon baco (back), Dutch bake (side of bacon, ham), Old English bæc (back). More at back.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /be.kɔn/, /be.kœn/
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NounEdit

bacon m (uncountable)

  1. bacon

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English bacon.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bacon m (invariable)

  1. bacon

SynonymsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

bacon

  1. Alternative form of bacoun

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English bacon.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bacon n (definite singular baconet)

  1. bacon

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English bacon.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bacon n (definite singular baconet)

  1. bacon

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

bacon m (oblique plural bacons, nominative singular bacons, nominative plural bacon)

  1. bacon, salted pork, ham, shank (of a pig)

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English bacon.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bacon m (plural bacons)

  1. bacon (cured meat from the belly, sides or back of a pig)

See alsoEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

bacon m (plural bacons)

  1. bacon

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English bacon.

NounEdit

bacon n

  1. bacon

DeclensionEdit

Declension of bacon 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative bacon baconet
Genitive bacons baconets