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See also: Gean, gean-, and gè'àn

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French guigne.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gean (plural geans)

  1. (now dialectal) A wild cherry tree, Prunus avium, native to Europe and western Asia or its small, dark fruit.
    • 1955, Robin Jenkins, The Cone-Gatherers, Canongate 2012, p. 45:
      ‘Given the circumstances, Effie,’ he whispered, ‘I could blossom again like a gean-tree.’

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

gean n

  1. soul, spirit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gean m (genitive singular geana)

  1. love, affection

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
gean ghean ngean
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

A variant of ġeġn.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

ġēan

  1. again

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish gen.

NounEdit

gean m

  1. cheerfulness, good humour

Derived termsEdit


West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian gān, from Proto-Germanic *gāną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰeh₁- (to leave). Compare Dutch gaan, Low German gahn, German gehen, English go, Danish .

VerbEdit

gean

  1. to go

ConjugationEdit

Usage notesEdit

  • (variant past tenses of gean):
    • 1st and 3rd person singular: gong, gyng
    • 2nd person singular: gongst, gyngst
    • plural: gongen, gyngen
    • past participle: gongen.
  • Gean is often omitted in colloquial speech. It is considered a default verb, so if a sentence has no verb, gean could most probably be inserted for purposes of English translation. It should be noted also that in earlier English, this could also be done; i.e. "We must away" for "We must go away" or "We must leave"
    • Hy weiHe went away / he has gone away (literally, “he away”)