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See also: génio, gênio, and genio-

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian. See genius.

NounEdit

genio (plural genios)

  1. (archaic) Somebody of a particular turn of mind.
    • Tatler
      Some genios are not capable of pure affection []

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for genio in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)


EsperantoEdit

NounEdit

genio (accusative singular genion, plural genioj, accusative plural geniojn)

  1. genius (intelligence)
  2. genius (intelligent person)
  3. genius (spirit in Roman mythology)

IdoEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

genio (uncountable)

  1. genius, brilliance

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin genius.

NounEdit

genio m (plural geni)

  1. genius
  2. spirit, genie

il genio

  1. (military) the engineers

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin genius, related to gignō (I beget) and genus (birth, origin).

NounEdit

genio m (plural genios)

  1. temper, mood
  2. genius
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from French génie, of Latin influence but based on Arabic جِنّ(jinn).

NounEdit

genio m (plural genios)

  1. jinn, genie