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See also: génial

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French génial, from Latin geniālis (of or pertaining to marriage; festive, genial), from genius (guardian spirit) + -ālis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

genial (comparative more genial, superlative most genial)

  1. Friendly and cheerful.
  2. (especially of weather) Pleasantly mild and warm.
  3. Marked by genius.
    • Hare
      Men of genius have often attached the highest value to their less genial works.
    • 2003, Laura Fermi, Gilberto Bernardini, Galileo and the Scientific Revolution, Courier Dover Publications, page 111 [1]:
      About fifty years later, in 1675, the Danish astronomer Ole Roemer (1644-1710) had the genial idea of using astronomical rather than terrestrial distances.
  4. (archaic) Contributing to, or concerned in, propagation or production; generative; procreative; productive.
  5. (obsolete) Belonging to one's genius or natural character; native; natural; inborn.
    • Sir Thomas Browne
      natural incapacity and genial indisposition
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Ancient Greek γένειον (géneion, chin) + -al.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

genial (not comparable)

  1. (anatomy) Relating to the chin; genian.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin geniālis.

AdjectiveEdit

genial (masculine and feminine plural genials)

  1. genius
  2. brilliant, great

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

genial (comparative genialer, superlative am genialsten)

  1. genius, ingenious, genial (in the sense of genius)

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin genialis

AdjectiveEdit

genial (neuter singular genialt, definite singular and plural geniale)

  1. ingenious, brilliant

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin genialis

AdjectiveEdit

genial (neuter singular genialt, definite singular and plural geniale)

  1. ingenious, brilliant

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

genial m, f (plural geniais, comparable)

  1. genial (marked by genius)
  2. genius (very clever)

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin geniālis (of or pertaining to marriage; festive, genial), from genius (guardian spirit) + -ālis.

AdjectiveEdit

genial (plural geniales)

  1. splendid, gorgeous, great
  2. ingenious
  3. genial, pleasant

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit