See also: Ginn

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ginn (plural ginns)

  1. Alternative spelling of jinn
    • (Can we date this quote?), The Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. (1810-1897), Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama, Vol 1[1]:
      AZA'ZEL, one of the ginn or jinn, all of whom were made of "smokeless fire," that is, the fire of the Simoom.
    • 1886, Andrew Lang, In the Wrong Paradise[2]:
      There also were the "maids of modest glances," previously indifferent to the wooing "of man or ginn."
    • (Can we date this quote?), Sax Rohmer (1883-1959), The Quest of the Sacred Slipper[3]:
      I accordingly assumed Hassan to be a myth--a first cousin to the ginn.

Etymology 2Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ginn

  1. Nonstandard form of given.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Charles Reade (1814-1884) and Dion Boucicault (1820-1890), Foul Play[4]:
      You ginn it us hot--you did.
    • 1912, Lawrence J. Burpee, Humour of the North[5]:
      Well, the doctor axed me to vote for his son, and I just up and told him I would, only my relation was candidating also; but ginn him my hand and promise I would be neuter.

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

 
ginn

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Irish gend (wedge), from Proto-Celtic *gendis (wedge), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰed- (to take, seize). Cognate with Welsh gaing (chisel, wedge), Breton genn (wedge) within Celtic and more distantly with Latin (pre)hendō and Ancient Greek χανδάνω (khandánō).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ginn f (genitive singular ginne, nominative plural geanntracha)

  1. (Cois Fharraige) Synonym of ding (wedge; thickset person)

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
ginn ghinn nginn
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*gendV-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 157
  2. ^ Tomás de Bhaldraithe, 1977, Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge: An Deilbhíocht, 2nd edition, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, section 24.
  • “ginn” in Foclóir Gaeḋilge agus Béarla, Irish Texts Society, 2nd ed., 1927, by Patrick S. Dinneen.

Further readingEdit


LuxembourgishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle High German geben, from Old High German geban, from Proto-Germanic *gebaną. Cognate with German geben, Dutch geven, West Frisian jaan, Danish give, Icelandic gefa.

VerbEdit

ginn (third-person singular present gëtt, preterite gouf or guff, past participle ginn, past subjunctive géif or giff, auxiliary verb hunn)

  1. (transitive) to give
  2. (intransitive, auxiliary verb sinn) to become
  3. (impersonal, transitive) there be, there is, there are; Used to indicate that something exists or is present
  4. (auxiliary) Used with the past participle of a transitive verb to form the passive voice.
  5. (auxiliary) Used with the past participle of any verb to form the impersonal passive voice.
ConjugationEdit
Irregular
infinitive ginn
participle ginn
auxiliary hunn
present
indicative
past
indicative
conditional imperative
1st singular ginn gouf géif
2nd singular gëss goufs géifs gëff
3rd singular gëtt gouf géif
1st plural ginn goufen géifen
2nd plural gitt gouft géift gitt
3rd plural ginn goufen géifen
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

ginn

  1. inflection of goen:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. first/third-person plural present indicative

YagaraEdit

NounEdit

ginn

  1. girl

ReferencesEdit